IHG Signs Agreement With Aleph Hospitality to Develop Ten Hotels Across Africa

United Kingdom, Denham. October 09, 2019

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG®), one of the world's leading hotel companies, has signed a Master Development Agreement (MDA) with Aleph Hospitality to develop ten franchise hotels across IHG's portfolio of brands in midscale and upscale segments. The agreement was signed at Africa Hotel Investment Forum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The MDA will see IHG expand its presence in Africa across key countries such as Kenya, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Morocco, Algeria and Ghana.

The addition of new hotels, as a part of the agreement, will solidify IHG's position as one of the leading hospitality players in the MEA region and will strengthen IHG's portfolio in the continent, across six brands including Crowne Plaza, voco, Hotel Indigo, Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn Express and Staybridge Suites.

With a portfolio including nine hotels across five countries on the continent and plans to expand to 35 hotels across the MEA region by 2025, Aleph Hospitality is a pioneering hotel management company offering a results-driven alternative to traditional hotel management models. The Dubai-based company manages hotels directly for owners and leverages its in-depth market knowledge and extensive experience of working with the world's largest hotel companies to generate superior returns for hotel owners.

Speaking on the announcement, Pascal Gauvin, Managing Director, India, Middle East and Africa, IHG said: "We are delighted to sign this agreement with Aleph Hospitality, which will add a significant number of rooms across our portfolio of brands in the African continent. Key markets across Africa continue to see solid growth in tourism key performance indicators and we remain optimistic of the long-term potential for the hospitality sector. The increasing number of international guests will drive a surge in demand for world-class accommodation and these new properties will cater to the needs of travellers looking for high-quality hospitality experiences."

Bani Haddad, Managing Director, Aleph Hospitality added: "This signing presents us with opportunities to further enhance and diversify our portfolio in Africa, and we are excited to partner with a globally renowned company such IHG to grow further in the region. With a strong distribution system, preferred brands and a top loyalty programme, IHG is known to deliver commercial success in collaborations with its owners and partners, and we look forward to successfully working together to open these hotels and offer exceptional experiences to suit a variety of travellers coming to this region."

IHG® currently operates 29 hotels across six brands including InterContinental® Hotels & Resorts, Six Senses, Crowne Plaza® Hotels & Resorts, Holiday Inn®, Holiday Inn Express ® and Staybridge Suites in Africa.

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