Pebblebrook Hotel Trust Completes Sale of Hotel Madera

USA, Bethesda, Maryland. October 14, 2019

Pebblebrook Hotel Trust (NYSE: PEB) (the "Company") today announced that it closed on the sale of the 82-room Hotel Madera in Washington, D.C. for $23.3 million to a third party.

The sale price of $23.3 million reflects a 14.3x EBITDA multiple and a 5.7% net operating income capitalization rate based on the hotel's operating performance for 2018. Based on the trailing 12-month period ended June 30, 2019, the contracted sales price reflects a 14.1x EBITDA multiple and a 5.9% net operating income capitalization rate.

Following the sale of Hotel Madera, the Company has completed a total of $1.3 billion of asset sales as part of its strategic disposition plan, and year to date, the Company has completed a total of $449.0 million of asset sales towards its goal of $600.0 million, which reflects a 15.7x EBITDA multiple and a 5.5% net operating income capitalization rate based on the hotels' performance for 2018. The net operating income capitalization rates above are after an assumed annual capital reserve of 4.0% of total hotel revenues.

Proceeds from the sale of Hotel Madera will be utilized for general business purposes which may include reducing the Company's outstanding debt. As a result of this completed sale, the Company estimates its total net debt to trailing 12-month corporate EBITDA will be approximately 4.6 times at the end of the third quarter 2019.

This press release contains certain "forward-looking statements" made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements are generally identifiable by use of forward-looking terminology such as "may," "will," "should," "potential," "intend," "expect," "seek," "anticipate," "estimate," "approximately," "believe," "could," "project," "predict," "forecast," "continue," "assume," "plan," references to "outlook" or other similar words or expressions. Forward-looking statements are based on certain assumptions and can include future expectations, future plans and strategies, financial and operating projections and forecasts and other forward-looking information and estimates. Examples of forward-looking statements include the following: the Company's net debt and EBITDA; descriptions of the Company's plans; forecasts of the Company's future economic performance and its share of future markets; forecasts of hotel industry performance; and descriptions of assumptions underlying or relating to any of the foregoing expectations including assumptions regarding the timing of their occurrence. These forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the Company's control, which could cause actual results to differ materially from such statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the state of the U.S. economy and the supply of hotel properties, and other factors as are described in greater detail in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including, without limitation, the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018. Unless legally required, the Company disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

For further information about the Company's business and financial results, please refer to the "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and "Risk Factors" sections of the Company's SEC filings, including, but not limited to, its Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, copies of which may be obtained at the Investor Relations section of the Company's website at www.pebblebrookhotels.com.

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