Longtime Hotel Industry Executive Ed Dykes Passes Away

USA, Fairfield, New Jersey. February 24, 2020

Ed Dykes, Vice President of Hotel Acquisitions for Paramount Hotel Group, passed away Saturday, February 15, 2020 following a battle with cancer.

Ed had more than 30 years of experience in the industry, having previously served as Senior Vice President of Operations for Prime Hospitality Corporation and playing a key role in growing the AmeriSuites brand (now Hyatt Place.) He joined Paramount Hotel Group in 2006, and was responsible for continuing the company's growth and expansion through hotel acquisitions and opportunities for new development.

"I was privileged to know and work with Ed and be able to call him a friend and colleague," said Ethan Kramer, President of Paramount Hotel Group. "I have known Ed for over 25 years and he was a key part of our company's success over the 14 years he was with Paramount and he will be greatly missed."

Ed is survived by his wife Peggy, daughter Brittany Mammen (Ryan), granddaughter Reagan Mammen, sister Vicki Dykes-Kent, nephew Vernon Spivey and niece Kessia Watkins.

Anyone who was working with Ed and wants to follow-up to discuss work-in-progress can contact David Hale, Vice President of Business Development at 901-598-0488 or via email at dhale@paramounthotelgroup.com


/ SLIDES

About Paramount Hotel Group

Media Contact:

David Hale
Vice President of Business Development
Paramount Hotel Group
T: 901-598-0488
E: dhale@paramounthotelgroup.com
W: http://www.paramounthotelgroup.com

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