Bitcoin: Simple Booking is the First Booking Engine Accepting Bitcoin as Payment Method for Direct Reservations

Italy, Florence, Italy. February 28, 2018

The team at Simple Booking, the innovative online hotel booking, announced today that it has successfully launched Bitcoin payments for online hotel bookings.

Independent hotels that use Simple Booking as their booking engine are the first in the world to be able to accept Bitcoin payments from their clients. The amount of each transaction will be transferred in real-time to a digital wallet, from where it can automatically be converted into euros or else stored as Bitcoin.

The Italian technology behind Simple Booking is the first to offer this capability, to the great satisfaction of General Manager, Duccio Innocenti: “Giants like Microsoft, Virgin Airlines and Expedia already offer payments in cryptocurrency, and more will surely soon do the same. No-one has yet thought of a Bitcoin payment solution for businesses in the hospitality sector and for us to be the first in the world is very exciting and spurs us on to further innovation, always with an Italian touch.”

The Bitcoin payment module, which is already available to Simple Booking clients, will be presented officially at the ITB show in Berlin, between the 7th and 11th of March.


/ SLIDES
Tags: CRS, BITCOIN, BOOKING ENGINE

About QNT Simple Booking

Media Contact:

Nicola Seghi
Evangelist
T: 331-233-6933
E: nicola@simplebooking.travel
W: http://www.simplebooking.travel

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