Editorial Board   

Mr. Simpson

Matthew Simpson

Attorney, Atlanta Office of Fisher & Phillips LLP

Matthew R. Simpson is an attorney in the Atlanta office of Fisher & Phillips LLP, one of the nation's leading labor and employment law firms representing employers. Mr, Simpson represents companies in all areas of labor and employment law in state and federal courts, as well as before state and federal agencies, including the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the United States Department of Labor and the National Labor Relations Board. A significant portion of Mr. Simpson's practice focuses on wage and hour law. He also counsels companies and their managers on "preventive" employee relations. This includes advice on employee screening and selection, drug and alcohol testing, wage and hour compliance harassment investigations, disciplinary strategies and terminations. He also drafts employment applications, employee handbooks, arbitration agreements, confidentiality agreements, and non-compete, non-solicitation and severance agreements and conducts regular on-site employment and wage-hour audits for his clients to ensure that they continue to be in compliance with changing laws and regulations. Mr. Simpson received the 2007 Georgia State Bar Labor and Employment Law Award and was listed in Georgia Super Lawyers - Rising Stars from 2011 to 2014. In addition, he was credited as an author on an e-discovery chapter in Data: Law and Litigation. The book provides an overview of legal issues associated with employment-related electronically stored information, focusing on discovery issues in particular. Mr. Simpson received a B.A. cum laude from Texas Christian University and J.D. with honors from Emory University School of Law. While in law school, Simpson was a member of the Emory Law Journal and was awarded the Georgia State Bar Labor and Employment Award.

Mr. Simpson can be contacted at 404-240-4221 or msimpson@laborlawyers.com

Coming up in March 2020...

Human Resources: Confronting a Labor Shortage

With the unemployment rate at its lowest level in decades (3.7%), what has always been a perennial problem for human resource professionals - labor shortage - is now reaching acute levels of concern. It is getting harder to find and recruit qualified applicants. Even finding candidates with the skills to succeed in entry-level positions has become an issue. In addition, employee turnover rates remain extremely high in the hotel industry. As a result of these problems, hotel HR managers are having to rethink their recruitment strategies in order to hire the right talent for the right job. First, hotels have been forced to raise their wages and offer other appealing perks, as a way to attract qualified candidates. Secondly, HR managers are reassessing their interviewing techniques, focusing less on the answers they receive to questions and more on observable behavior. Part of this process includes role-playing during the interview, so that the recruiter can gauge how a candidate works through specific problems and interacts with other team members. Additionally, some HR managers are also creating internal talent pools as a way to address labor shortages. Instead of utilizing department resources to find new hires with specific skills for needed positions, hotels are cultivating talent pools internally and preparing their employees to assume leadership roles whenever the time comes. They are also placing greater emphasis on a company culture that is more performance-based, as a way to curb employee turnover, increase employee satisfaction, and assure higher levels of customer service. Finally, recognizing the importance of employee retention as a way to lessen the impact of a tight labor market, some HR managers are instituting generous reward programs in order to retain their top performers. The March Hotel Business Review will explore what some HR professionals are doing to address these and other issues in their departments.