David Bilicic

Research firm Magid digs into the opportunities and challenges presented by subscriptions in the hospitality industry, especially among loyalty program members. Magid found that travelers who already belong to a loyalty program are much more likely to be interested in a subscription program offering than those who are not part of loyalty programs. This research, which was conducted through an online study of 3,000 individuals who have an active subscription within one of 14 business verticals (Including meal kits, fitness, music, beauty, clothing and more), also delves into other consumer perceptions around subscription programs including price, offerings and "must-haves." Read on...

Mark Ricketts

There's clearly a fun side to hospitality, one that we should embrace and celebrate, for our guests, our host communities and ourselves. Keeping hospitality entertaining is a great way to keep staff engaged. It's about teamwork, motivation and a sense of pride in one's work, as well as a way to show appreciation for what our people do to make us look great in a wide range of activities and interactions with others. In this way, fun also has a serious side and can accomplish a great deal for our organizations. Read on...

Jackson Thilenius

Why should we consider hostels a hot new market? With the rise of the sharing economy and the power of millennial spending, there is a lot to unpack as to why hostels are thriving in this economy. Beyond being a growing trend, hostels are quickly driving more market share as they become a "go-to" for today's generation of savvy travelers who will spend less so that they can travel more without sacrificing value-based amenities they rely on. Jackson Thilenius, Principal at Retail Design Collaborative, elaborates. Read on...

Simon Hudson

Après ski in ski resorts used to consist of a few pints of ale and plate of nachos, but increasingly the bubbly allure of champagne, beer and spirits is being packaged by resorts into beer and distillery tours, private in-room liquor tastings, champagne toasts on the slopes, and beverage and food pairings. This article takes a look at some of the ski industry's more innovative beverage-focused offerings, from North America's highest-elevation fine-dining in Telluride offering a choice of 400 wines 12,000 feet above sea level, to Pow Day, the Waldorf Astoria Park City's own custom craft beer. Read on...

Library Archives

 
Christine Samsel

The past twelve months have seen a significant uptick in the volume of cases filed related to website accessibility issues, with the most recent trend being claims by disabled prospective employees for inaccessible online job search and application processes that allegedly render them unable to browse and apply for open positions. Attorneys Christine Samsel and Jonathan Sandler provide legal insight on this trend and what business leaders can do to protect their company from these types of claims… Read on...

Steven D. Weber

In the hospitality industry it is crucial to have the right employees. The right employees may enable a hospitality player to provide an ideal environment for its customers that may leave a lasting impression that will lead to future business. To retain employees, hospitality players may consider entering into a no-poach agreement. A no-poach agreement between hospitality players may be, among other things, an agreement that two players agree not to hire employees from each other. Such agreements may be unlawful, and hospitality players should be wary of them and consult with legal counsel before entering into them. Read on...

Adria Levtchenko

Hospitality organizations increasingly rely on data-driven technologies and systems to inform and guide most any level of operations, management or strategy. One of the key challenges in this trend is to make data in all of its forms as accessible and useful as possible for the frontline staff that works with guests directly on a daily basis. Pursued carefully, we can improve efficiencies and profitability, motivate employees and, overall, also make technology adoption easier instead of more difficult. Read on...

Bonnie Knutson

Generation Z is actually known by several names. But whatever it is called, this generation is the one that follows the infamous Millennials.. Typically, demographers and researchers classify iGens as those born between 1995 to 2005, putting them still in school with leading edge finishing up their college years. Although this cohort is still relatively young, they influence about $600 Billion of what and where their family spends its time and money – i.e. that's about 70% of their parents' spending. Already they are swaying their family's travel decisions. By 2020 – that's less than two short years from now - they will represent 40% of the world's consumers. In this article, you learn more about this up and coming generation and how your hotel can attract their business. Read on...

Pete Pearson

Food waste wastes money. In the US alone, we waste more than $160 billion worth of food each year. Reducing waste is a perfect example of how more sustainable business practices can sustain people, planet, and prosperity all at the same time. The food waste debate often focuses on how to keep waste out of landfills by diverting it to people, animals or compost (in that order). That's a worthwhile goal, but it's not the best way to save money-or the planet. Rather, preventing food waste is the most effective way to save money and the environment. Read on...

David Ashen

With hoteliers' attention split between the boomer generations' affinity for luxury and the younger guest's preference for high technology and social interaction, David Ashen, principal and founder of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design, explores how hoteliers are catering to each group, separately-including trendy rooftop bars and combination bar/lobby areas for the younger set and refined restaurants and luxurious amenities for boomer guests-and the importance of flexible design elements to balance guest wants and needs across generations. Read on...

Stephen Jacobs

'Urban Resorts' are among the top trends in hospitality design right now, catering to people looking to escape to the city, rather than away from it. Urban Resorts offer the best of everything, allowing guests to stay in the urban core, while getting that sense of suburban retreat, with designs that bring the outdoors in, lots of natural light, rooftop amenities, sustainability and more. In a city like Toronto, which is at the forefront of North American tourism, we wanted to invite guests to feel like they're at the center of the excitement, without feeling like they couldn't escape it. Read on...

Brian Wise

Hospitality marketers are currently facing a more challenging landscape than ever when it comes to attracting and appealing to millennials. The methods used for generations past are proving to be irrelevant for this current audience, not just in where they are going, but why. And with the generation on track to make up 75 percent of all hotel guests by 2020, hospitality industry professionals should start to learn what amenities make them tick – and why they all point to Vegas. Read on...

Luna Phillips

As fresh water supplies across the country stretch thinner due to a confluence of factors, hotel developers and managers are getting squeezed. An increasing focus on water conservation from consumers and both state and local regulators has its benefits, but also creates economic drawbacks for hotel executives by decreasing the supply and increasing the price of water. This added cost raises the price of admission for both owners and consumers, but armed with the correct information and tactics, hotel executives can shrewdly save valuable dollars while playing by these new rules. Read on...

Ray Chung

Hotels today can and should use F&B to establish a unique personality. As guests increasingly look to bar and dining experiences for entertainment, hotels can take advantage of their venues to express themselves and leave a lasting impression. Restaurants, bars and even the event catering service can define a hotel as local, unique, lively and entertaining. To be competitive and ensure success in the long run, hotels should pay close attention to guest preferences, the design of F&B areas and the culture of the region and neighborhood, always striving to be original. Read on...

S. Lakshmi Narasimhan

At the end of the day, from an owner and stakeholder perspective, business performance is an operational issue while productivity is a strategic issue. In a manner of speaking, productivity is a reflection of how efficiently business performance is achieved. Owners are in business for the long haul. A long haul can only be sustained if the means to ends are consistently efficient. It is productivity that makes return on investment a long term factor and vindicates the huge investment forked out. Stakeholders tend to sleep well knowing that an efficient system of producing business performance is at work and incrementally improving. Read on...

Lisa Ross

Learn why integrated marketing communications is essential to your hotel's success. The essence of integrated marketing is to meld consistent brand messages across all channels to provide a seamless experience for consumers to interact with your brand. As new marketing strategies and digital platforms have evolved and launched over the past decade from Google, Facebook and Twitter to Instagram, Snapchat and Pinterest, it has never been more important to have effective integration of brand messages and channels. This article will review what integrated marketing means and share how to create a multi-platform and cross-channel marketing program… Read on...

Leora Halpern Lanz

The number of customer touchpoints between a hotel and its guests only continue to increase. In reviewing some of those touchpoints, one better understands the expertise needed to manage those moments and how hotel brands use varying methods to bring together skills sets for optimal (digital) customer experiences. How brands determine to manage the increasing touchpoints for optimal connection, will help distinguish them from the competition as they strive for continued excellence in customer contact. Read on...

Scott Acton

Form and function are two critical components of building design. That statement might be a no-brainer for some, but we often fail to connect how this relates to our experience of a space. It's safe to say we have all reaped the benefits of experiential design, but it was most likely unknowingly. Scott Acton, CEO and founder of Forte Specialty Contractors, shares his thoughts on experiential design and how its changing the hospitality and entertainment sector. Read on...

Steven Ferry

In the first two articles in this series, we looked at how independent Quality Assurance programs have fallen into a conventional wisdom and modus operandi that is out of touch with their clients' and their guests' needs and then examined the challenges and relevance of QA in helping their client's assess their performance in a world increasingly guided by the megaphone of social-media reviews. In this third and last article, we look at what an ideal QA program would look like, in the hope that third-party QA companies, and/or internal QA programs are listening and decide to upgrade their assessments and programs. Read on...

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Coming up in January 2019...

Mobile Technology: The Future is Now

Mobile Technology continues to advance at a relentless pace and the hotel industry continues to adapt. Hotel guests have shown a strong preference for mobile self-service - from checking-in/out at a hotel kiosk, to ordering room service, making dinner reservations, booking spa treatments, and managing laundry/dry cleaning services. And they also enjoy the convenience of paying for these services with smart phone mobile payments. In addition, some hotels have adopted a “concierge in your pocket” concept. Through a proprietary hotel app, guests can access useful information such as local entertainment venues, tourist attractions, event calendars, and medical facilities and services. In-room entertainment continues to be a key factor, as guests insist on the capacity to plug in their own mobile devices to customize their entertainment choices. Mobile technology also allows for greater marketing opportunities. For example, many hotels have adopted the use of “push notifications” - sending promotions, discounts and special event messages to guests based on their property location, purchase history, profiles, etc. Near field communication (NFC) technology is also being utilized to support applications such as opening room doors, earning loyalty points, renting a bike, accessing a rental car, and more. Finally, some hotels have adopted more futuristic technology. Robots are in use that have the ability to move between floors to deliver room service requests for all kinds of items - food, beverages, towels, toothbrushes, chargers and snacks. And infrared scanners are being used by housekeeping staff that can detect body heat within a room, alerting staff that the room is occupied and they should come back at a later time. The January Hotel Business Review will report on what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in this exciting mobile technology space.