Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Spector

Dave Spector

Partner, Tambourine

Dave Spector is a Partner at Tambourine, a marketing technology company specializing in helping hotels and tourism organizations increase revenue. The firm, with offices in Fort Lauderdale and New York City, has doubled in size every year since 2011. The firm is a member of HSMAI, HFTP, AHLA and was recently honored with Travel Weekly and HSMAI's highest awards. Prior to Tambourine, Mr. Spector was a member of the start-up team at two ventures that grew rapidly and eventually went public, with annual revenues of more than $150M. He specializes in fixing broken marketing tactics and believes marketing teams, like their sales counterparts, should be held accountable for revenue production. For ten years, Mr. Spector was a Partner and creative director at one of the fastest-growing advertising agencies in the Southeast United States. The agency was sold in 1999 to WPP Group/London (NASDAQ: WPPGY), the world's largest Advertising Agency. The following year, Mr. Spector helped raise $6M in venture capital and co‐founded vFinance, Inc, one of the first truly integrated online/offline financial services firms. The firm went public and merged with National Securities (NHLD) in 2009. Today, the firm generates more than $125M in annual revenue worldwide. In 2005, Mr. Spector was co-founder of a software start-up enabling parents to monitor and protect their children on the internet. The firm partnered with the United States Justice Department and National Crime Prevention Council to launch McGruff Safeguard. Since its inception, the Company has helped more than 300,000 families safeguard their internet activity. In 2008, Mr. Spector was recruited by Kaseya, a global enterprise software company, to become its Senior Vice-President of Marketing, where he managed an annual marketing budget of $15 million dollars across 17 countries. Mr. Spector joined Tambourine is 2011 as a Partner and has been instrumental in the firm's rapid growth. Mr. Spector is a frequent public speaker at HSMAI, industry and university events. He lives in Delray Beach, Florida with his wife and two daughters who constantly remind him that he knows very little about anything.

Please visit http://www.tambourine.com for more information.

Mr. Spector can be contacted at 561-278-4898 or dave@tambourine.com

Coming up in May 2019...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Corporate Social Responsibility

The hotel industry has undertaken a long-term effort to build more responsible and socially conscious businesses. What began with small efforts to reduce waste - such as paperless checkouts and refillable soap dispensers - has evolved into an international movement toward implementing sustainable development practices. In addition to establishing themselves as good corporate citizens, adopting eco-friendly practices is sound business for hotels. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 95% of business travelers believe the hotel industry should be undertaking “green” initiatives, and Millennials are twice as likely to support brands with strong management of environmental and social issues. Given these conclusions, hotels are continuing to innovate in the areas of environmental sustainability. For example, one leading hotel chain has designed special elevators that collect kinetic energy from the moving lift and in the process, they have reduced their energy consumption by 50%  over conventional elevators. Also, they installed an advanced air conditioning system which employs a magnetic mechanical system that makes them more energy efficient. Other hotels are installing Intelligent Building Systems which monitor and control temperatures in rooms, common areas and swimming pools, as well as ventilation and cold water systems. Some hotels are installing Electric Vehicle charging stations, planting rooftop gardens, implementing stringent recycling programs, and insisting on the use of biodegradable materials. Another trend is the creation of Green Teams within a hotel's operation that are tasked to implement earth-friendly practices and manage budgets for green projects. Some hotels have even gone so far as to curtail or eliminate room service, believing that keeping the kitchen open 24/7 isn't terribly sustainable. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.