Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Chua

Christopher Chua

Managing Director, BLINK Design Group

BLINK's managing director Christopher Chua finds deep satisfaction in seeing a design job through from concept to completion, and he relishes being a designer who can turn his hand to architecture in all its shapes and forms. "For me the thrill is being faced with a fresh challenge and the chance to apply my knowledge in different ways. From tented naturalist villas to cool urban chic hotels, from minimalist to opulent, every project is a signature within itself.” Mr. Chua's intelligent understanding of space and his instinctive feel for design make him the most valued of creative talents: a highly skilled, unfettered yet disciplined mind. He is at one with his craft, living and breathing hotels and resorts to produce work that resonates and inspires. During nine years as an associate with Singapore's eco.id, Mr. Chua worked on resorts at the farther reaches of luxury, including The Shangri-La Saadiyat Beach, Abu Dhabi; Nikki Beach Resort, Qatar; The Saladaeng Residences, Bangkok; and TAJ Vivanta resorts in Assam and Chennai. He has developed a deep understanding of the symbiosis between branding and design. Since joining BLINK, he has unleashed the full force of his creativity in India and China, and has been instrumental in the company's Shanghai office launch and subsequent rapid growth in China. Mr. Chua's ability to develop relationships with clients also applies to his team, which totals almost 200 people in four studios from Bangkok to Singapore, New Delhi and Shanghai. He achieves results because he motivates those around him, inspiring them with his vision, leading by example and developing a strong bond with existing clients while being instrumental in winning new ones.

Mr. Chua can be contacted at +65 9273 4098 or christopher.c@blinkdg.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.