Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Friedman Griesing

Francine Friedman Griesing

Founder, Griesing Law LLC

Fran Griesing, founder of Griesing Law, LLC, a WBENC-certified woman owned firm, leads her team representing clients in complex business transactions, high stakes litigation, employment, intellectual property and alternate dispute resolution matters. She also serves as a neutral arbitrator and mediator. Ms. Griesing's clients are Fortune 500 and closely held companies, not-for-profit organizations and executives, predominately in the hospitality, food service, technology, chemicals and manufacturing industries. Chambers and Partners USA, a leading directory of the legal profession, has noted that clients describe her as “intensely detail-focused and a persuasive and energetic litigator” with a “professional and personable manner.” Chambers expressly recognized her for her work in the hospitality industry, and her “practical and down-to-earth counsel.” Prior to launching the firm in 2010, Ms. Griesing practiced at top tier firms in New York and Philadelphia and, she served as Litigation Chair of Philadelphia's Law Department under former Mayor Edward G. Rendell, who later served as Pennsylvania's Governor. An honors graduate of Binghamton University and University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she was on Law Review, Ms. Griesing has been recognized for her professional and community leadership. She has been acknowledged as a Pennsylvania Woman Lawyer of the Year, Woman to Watch; Greater Philadelphia Woman of Distinction; Governor's Best 50 Women in Business; SmartCEO Brava! Leader and Legal Elite. She has been recognized by Chambers and Partners USA, Best Lawyers in America and Pennsylvania SuperLawyers. Ms. Griesing also received the Philadelphia Bar Education Center's Excellence in Legal Education Award and the American Bar Association's Excellence in Legal Writing Award. Ms. Griesingtaught Business Law, Public Employment Law and Advocacy Skills at Temple University's Beasley School of Law and Fox School of Business & Management and was a guest lecturer at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. She has been acknowledged as a Pennsylvania Woman Lawyer of the Year, Woman to Watch; Greater Philadelphia Woman of Distinction; Governor's Best 50 Women in Business; SmartCEO Brava! Leader and Legal Elite. She has been recognized by Chambers and Partners USA, Best Lawyers in America and Pennsylvania SuperLawyers. Ms. Griesing also received the Philadelphia Bar Education Center's Excellence in Legal Education Award and the American Bar Association's Excellence in Legal Writing Award. She taught Business Law, Public Employment Law and Advocacy Skills at Temple University's Beasley School of Law and Fox School of Business & Management and was a guest lecturer at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Ms. Friedman Griesing can be contacted at 215-618-3721 or fgriesing@griesinglaw.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.