Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Friedman Griesing

Francine Friedman Griesing

Founder, Griesing Law LLC

Fran Griesing, founder of Griesing Law, LLC, a WBENC-certified woman owned firm, leads her team representing clients in complex business transactions, high stakes litigation, employment, intellectual property and alternate dispute resolution matters. She also serves as a neutral arbitrator and mediator. Ms. Griesing's clients are Fortune 500 and closely held companies, not-for-profit organizations and executives, predominately in the hospitality, food service, technology, chemicals and manufacturing industries. Chambers and Partners USA, a leading directory of the legal profession, has noted that clients describe her as “intensely detail-focused and a persuasive and energetic litigator” with a “professional and personable manner.” Chambers expressly recognized her for her work in the hospitality industry, and her “practical and down-to-earth counsel.” Prior to launching the firm in 2010, Ms. Griesing practiced at top tier firms in New York and Philadelphia and, she served as Litigation Chair of Philadelphia's Law Department under former Mayor Edward G. Rendell, who later served as Pennsylvania's Governor. An honors graduate of Binghamton University and University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she was on Law Review, Ms. Griesing has been recognized for her professional and community leadership. She has been acknowledged as a Pennsylvania Woman Lawyer of the Year, Woman to Watch; Greater Philadelphia Woman of Distinction; Governor's Best 50 Women in Business; SmartCEO Brava! Leader and Legal Elite. She has been recognized by Chambers and Partners USA, Best Lawyers in America and Pennsylvania SuperLawyers. Ms. Griesing also received the Philadelphia Bar Education Center's Excellence in Legal Education Award and the American Bar Association's Excellence in Legal Writing Award. Ms. Griesingtaught Business Law, Public Employment Law and Advocacy Skills at Temple University's Beasley School of Law and Fox School of Business & Management and was a guest lecturer at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. She has been acknowledged as a Pennsylvania Woman Lawyer of the Year, Woman to Watch; Greater Philadelphia Woman of Distinction; Governor's Best 50 Women in Business; SmartCEO Brava! Leader and Legal Elite. She has been recognized by Chambers and Partners USA, Best Lawyers in America and Pennsylvania SuperLawyers. Ms. Griesing also received the Philadelphia Bar Education Center's Excellence in Legal Education Award and the American Bar Association's Excellence in Legal Writing Award. She taught Business Law, Public Employment Law and Advocacy Skills at Temple University's Beasley School of Law and Fox School of Business & Management and was a guest lecturer at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Ms. Friedman Griesing can be contacted at 215-618-3721 or fgriesing@griesinglaw.com

Coming up in March 2020...

Human Resources: Confronting a Labor Shortage

With the unemployment rate at its lowest level in decades (3.7%), what has always been a perennial problem for human resource professionals - labor shortage - is now reaching acute levels of concern. It is getting harder to find and recruit qualified applicants. Even finding candidates with the skills to succeed in entry-level positions has become an issue. In addition, employee turnover rates remain extremely high in the hotel industry. As a result of these problems, hotel HR managers are having to rethink their recruitment strategies in order to hire the right talent for the right job. First, hotels have been forced to raise their wages and offer other appealing perks, as a way to attract qualified candidates. Secondly, HR managers are reassessing their interviewing techniques, focusing less on the answers they receive to questions and more on observable behavior. Part of this process includes role-playing during the interview, so that the recruiter can gauge how a candidate works through specific problems and interacts with other team members. Additionally, some HR managers are also creating internal talent pools as a way to address labor shortages. Instead of utilizing department resources to find new hires with specific skills for needed positions, hotels are cultivating talent pools internally and preparing their employees to assume leadership roles whenever the time comes. They are also placing greater emphasis on a company culture that is more performance-based, as a way to curb employee turnover, increase employee satisfaction, and assure higher levels of customer service. Finally, recognizing the importance of employee retention as a way to lessen the impact of a tight labor market, some HR managers are instituting generous reward programs in order to retain their top performers. The March Hotel Business Review will explore what some HR professionals are doing to address these and other issues in their departments.