Editorial Board   Guest Author

Dr. Zemke

Dina Zemke

Assistant Professor William f. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Dina Marie Zemke, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where she primarily teaches courses in facilities management. Prior to her academic career, she obtained industry experience with Hilton Hotels, starting in the property operations department at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City, followed by the Tarrytown Hilton. She followed that with a career in sales with Otis Elevator in New York and Wisconsin. One of Dr. Zemke's research interests is examining hotel design and its relationship with property performance and guest and employee satisfaction. The work is focusing on how to determine how assessing design quality can help in the capital reinvestment decision-making process. An additional research area examines how to incorporate hospitality principles into healthcare settings to improve hospital performance and patient satisfaction. Past projects include the studies of ambient scent and ambient noise in hospitality settings, gaming customer profiling, and hotel cleanliness. She has published in numerous academic journals and co-authored a textbook, Managing the Built Environment in Hospitality Facilities, with fellow UNLV faculty member Thomas Jones. Dr. Zemke holds BOMI's Real Property Administrator designation and is also holds the LEED-Green Associate credential. She is a member of the Nevada chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council, as well as the AH&LA's Sustainability Committee. An active member of the Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Educators (CHRIE), she serves as the chair of the Facilities Management special interest group, which exists to support hospitality educators who teach facilities planning, management, and design. She is also a member of the CHRIE Research SIG and the Environmental Hospitality Issues SIG. Dr. Zemke has a Ph.D. from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and MBA from the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management, and a BS from Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration. Prior to returning to UNLV in 2012, she also taught in hospitality programs at the University of New Hampshire, Cornell University, and Johnson & Wales University - Charlotte.

Dr. Zemke can be contacted at 702-895-4844 or dina.zemke@unlv.edu

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.