Editorial Board   Guest Author

Dr. Scanlon, Ph.D.

Nancy Loman Scanlon, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, FIU

Dr. Nancy Loman Scanlon is an Associate Professor at the Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Florida International University. She has over thirty years of lodging industry experience with Hilton Hotels, Marriott Corporation and Interstate Hotels. Dr. Scanlon is the Vice-Chair of the Sustainability Committee of the American Hotel and Lodging Association and serves on the Advisory Panel of the International Tourism Partnership (ITP) London, England. For the United Nations she serves on the UN Disaster Risk Reduction Words In-to Action Committee: Tourism Sector. At the 2015 Summit, she presented on “Miami, A City Slipping Back In-to the Sea”. Dr. Scanlon is chairperson of the Sustainability Council of the Greater Miami and the Beaches Hotel Association. She is also a participant in both the Miami Beach Sea Level Rise Initiative and the Sea Level Rise Institute for Florida International University. Dr. Scanlon speaks internationally on climate change impacts and sustainability issues affecting tourism and is a leader in the application and research of sustainable operating practices and climate change adaptation for the hospitality industry. Her recent travels include several trips to China and Japan. As an advisory board member for MCW Global, Dr. Scanlon recently visited the organizations community centers in Arusha and Songea, Tanzania and Lusaka, Zambia. Dr. Scanlon is the author of several hospitality industry books published by John Wiley and Sons, in addition to refereed conference presentations and journal articles. She holds a PHD in public policy and an MA from the University of Delaware.

Dr. Scanlon, Ph.D. can be contacted at 305-919-4775 or nscanlon@fiu.edu

Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.