Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Dunphy

Maggy Dunphy

Spa Director, Stowe Mountain Lodge

I grew up in a family of seven children. Believe it or not - I was quite the tomboy - most certainly not a spa girl. And each and every day I had one goal - to beat the boys in everything. And I usually did. It wasn't very helpful in my teenage years as I was concerned more with beating the boys, than kissing them. Sports became an outlet for me and I attribute my drive for perfection, ambition to win, passion for excellence, and my unique leadership style on the coaches and athletes that believed in me and taught me the principles of teamwork. I began my career in hospitality as a massage therapist in Vail, escaping the East Coast and management responsibilities to become a free spirit therapist in the mountains of Colorado. That didn't last long as leading people was in my blood. I was in the right place at the right time - and have grown up in the spa industry. My first Spa Director job paid me a whopping $14,000, but I received a small commission on every treatment performed. I turned a janitor closet into a massage room, so we wouldn't turn away the business. It was definitely not about the “experience” in those days. So much has changed in the spa industry and I am blessed to have grown up with Destination Hotels as my “bus driver”. I knew I was on the right bus!

Please visit www.stowemountainlodge.com for more information.

Ms. Dunphy can be contacted at 802-760-4703 or mdunphy@destinationhotels.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.