Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. King

Tim King

Design Director, Luxlo

Tim King is the principal designer for Luxlo, a luxury London-based residential developer, which is now making its first foray into Beverly Hills. Mr. King has collaborated with some of most iconic innovators and trendsetters in the hospitality and lifestyle space and recently completed a total redesign of Mosaic Hotel.

Through his diverse experience in all aspects of architecture, design, space planning and project management, Mr. King has developed the distinct daring style he is best known for today—bold interiors that strike a playful balance between the classic and the contemporary.

Born and raised in West London, Mr. King's family was always involved in real estate, hence his early inspiration. He attended boarding school, where he received a well-rounded education. During summers and holidays, he traveled extensively with his family, taking in arts & architectural experiences from around the world.

Inspired by his travels, Mr. King went on to study interior architecture at Brighton University before securing a job with Northacre, a high-end development firm in London. During this time, he worked on prestigious projects from large residential homes to several projects in Dubai, a palace in Riyadh and a 55-meter Super yacht built in Holland.

After 12 years, Mr. King took his current position for Luxlo, where he has now served as the design director for five years. Among Luxlo's most notable achievements are 77 MAYFAIR, an iconic residential development in Central London, which has achieved record prices and the recent redesign of Mosaic Hotel in Los Angeles.

Please visit www.l-design.com for more information.

Mr. King can be contacted at 442036644035 or tim@luxlo.co.uk

Coming up in September 2020...

Hotel Group Meetings: Demand vs. Supply

It is a great time for hotel group meetings. It is expected that once again this sector will grow by 5-10% in 2020, partly due to the increasing value of in-person group meetings. Because people now spend so much time in front of their screens, face-to-face interactions have become a more treasured commodity in our modern world. Plus, the use of social media reinforces the value of engagement, discussion, conversation, and networking - all areas where group meetings shine. Despite this rosy outlook, there is a concern that demand for meetings far exceeds the supply of suitable venues and hotels. There are very few "big box" properties with 500-plus rooms and extensive conference facilities being built, and this shortage of inventory could pose a serious challenge for meeting planners. In addition to location concerns, the role of the meeting planner has also evolved significantly. Planners are no longer just meeting coordinators - they are de facto travel agents. Cultural interactions, local dining, experiential travel, and team-building activities are all now a part of their meeting mix. Plus, they have to cater to evolving tastes. Millennials are insisting on healthier venues and activities, and to meet their demands, hotels are making yoga breaks, fresh-pressed juices, plant-based diets, state-of-the-art gyms, and locally-sourced menus available. Millennials are also insisting that meeting venues practice Corporate Social Responsibility, which means upholding sustainable and ethical values; investment in the local community; health and well-being of employees; and general business practices that reflect being good citizens of the planet. Finally, there is a growing trend to merge meetings with other local events, such as music festivals, sporting events, and cultural attractions. The December Hotel Business Review will report on issues relevant to group meetings and will document what some hotels are doing to support this part of their operations.