Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Reid

Gaynor Reid

Vice President Communications & CSR, Accor Asia Pacific

Gaynor Reid is Vice President Communications & CSR for Accor Asia Pacific, based in the company's Singapore regional head office. She has worked for Accor for 18 years, starting in the group's Sydney office as Media Relations Manager and moving to Asia in 2013. She oversees the group's communications strategy, corporate social responsibility (CSR) and crisis management to consistently articulate Accor's messaging to both internal and external audiences.

Prior to joining AccorHotels, Ms. Reid oversaw Communications and Community Relations for the Sydney Organising Committee for the Olympic Games (SOCOG) and managed SOCOG's Welcome the World project to prepare Australia to welcome visitors from across the world for the Olympics. With a background in journalism, she was also a reporter and editor for ten years before moving into Public Relations and Marketing. An award-winning communications professional, Ms. Reid was awarded Best Hotel PR of the Year 2013 (Hotel Management Awards), Communicator of the Year 2011 (Australian Society of Travel Writers), Best Hotel PR 2009 (HM Awards) and Best PR Member 2004 (Australian Society of Travel Writers) as well as being a multiple finalist in similar awards over the past decade.

Born in South Africa to Scottish parents and having lived in Africa, Australia, Asia and the UK, she says she was born to travel and that her job combines her passions for hotels, food and travel. Ms. Reid oversees communications for Accor's 1000+ hotels across Asia Pacific in 20 countries for brands including Raffles, Orient Express, Fairmont, Sofitel, Pullman, Novotel, Mercure and ibis. Ms. Reid also sits on the group's Executive Committee for Asia Pacific.


Please visit http://www.accor.com for more information.

Ms. Reid can be contacted at 65-6408-8864 or gaynor.reid@accor.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.