Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Stormont

Jim Stormont

President, Stormont Hospitality Group, LLC

Jim Stormont co-founded Stormont Hospitality Group, LLC in 2001 after the sale of Stormont Trice Corporation, a full service hotel management firm in which Mr. Stormont was a principal and the Chief Financial Officer. In 2012 Mr. Stormont re-launched Stormont Hospitality Group as a hotel developer, financial advisor, and asset manager in addition to his ongoing partnership at Grove Street Partners, a real estate firm where Mr. Stormont lead the hotel development and finance practice until 2015 when he resigned from Grove Street to focus solely on Stormont Hospitality. Mr. Stormont's 30 year career in hotel development and finance began at Marriott International and has included positions as CFO of Stormont Trice Corporation., Executive Vice President of Noble Investment Group LLC, Partner at Grove Street Partners, LLC and President at Stormont Hospitality Group, LLC. Throughout his hotel career, Mr. Stormont has gained invaluable experience in all aspects of the development, operation and ownership of hotels, conference centers and resorts. He has played an instrumental lead role in the successful structuring, financing and development of hotels, conference centers and resort properties totaling more than $1 billion. A majority of these hospitality projects have involved structuring economically challenging and complex public/private partnerships requiring extensive legal and financial negotiations with multiple parties. Mr. Stormont has gained a national reputation for public/private hotel development expertise. An Atlanta, Georgia resident, Mr. Stormont and his wife of over 33 years, Beth, have three children, Sarah, Mac and Andy, ages 28, 25, and 23. Sarah attends graduate school in Austin TX, Mac is a consultant with Deloitte in Boston, MA, and Andy is a Financial Analyst in Atlanta, GA. Mr. Stormont is a graduate of Middlebury College (B.A. in Economics) and Cornell University's Johnson Graduate School of Management (M.B.A. in Finance) and is involved in numerous community activities. Mr. Stormont is a Member at the Rotary Club of Atlanta, a Member of the Livable Communities Council of the Urban Land Institute, the past President of his Homeowner's Association, and a former Board Member (Finance Committee Chairman) at Atlanta Country Club where he plays to a scratch handicap. He is a recent golf Club Champion and has qualified and played in both the US Senior Open and the US Senior Amateur golf tournaments.

Please visit http://www.stormonthospitality.com for more information.

Mr. Stormont can be contacted at 770-818-4198 or jstormont@stormonthospitality.com

Coming up in May 2020...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Creative Innovation

Being eco-friendly is no longer a fad. It is an urgent planetary need and hotels are actively doing their part to reduce their carbon footprint by implementing sustainable, green practices. In addition to the goodwill derived from doing the right thing, hotels are also realizing the benefits to their business. A large percentage of Millennials expect hotels to be eco-friendly and will only patronize those properties that are proudly conforming. Consequently, more hotels are realizing that sustainability is a key element in a successful branding strategy. In addition, going green can lead to a more profitable bottom line, as savings on electricity, water and cleaning materials can add up. Also, there are other advantages that come with being an eco-friendly business, such as government subsidies and tax and loan incentives. As a result, many hotels are finding innovative ways to integrate eco-friendly practices into their business. Geo-thermal energy systems, along with energy-from-waste systems, are being used to heat and cool the property. Passive solar panels, green roofs, natural lighting and natural ventilation strategies also assist in energy conservation. Low-flow water systems and plumbing fixtures make a contribution, as does eco-friendly hardwood flooring, and energy efficient televisions and appliances throughout the property. In addition, some hotels have implemented in-room recycling programs, and only provide all-natural, personal care items. One hotel has actually constructed a bee-keeping operation on their grounds. Not only is this good for the bees but the hotel also produces products from the operation which they sell. This kind of creative innovation also holds enormous appeal to guests. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.