Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Bailey

Amy Bailey

VP of Finance and HR, TSheets

Amy Bailey oversees all of the finance, human resource, legal, and facilities operations at TSheets — a time tracking and employee scheduling app that's used by 20,000 businesses worldwide. Her key role is to make the entire enterprise run smoothly, so the TSheets team can stay hyper-focused on helping its customers journey into greatness. Before TSheets, Ms. Bailey spent eight years working in the business assurance group at Coopers & Lybrand, now better known as PricewaterhouseCoopers following its 1998 merger with Price Waterhouse. Back in the technology sector, TSheets is just one of a number of high-growth companies that Ms. Bailey has worked for during her career. She has more than 25 years of experience in the sector having worked for Microsoft, Extended Systems (a printer-sharing and data/server management system company that was acquired by Sybase), ProClarity (a business intelligence and data analysis software company that was acquired by Microsoft in 2006), and Silverback Learning Solutions (a SaaS company focused on solutions to provide individualized learning plans and interventions for students). Amy also spent 3 years consulting for Marlin Equity (a global investment firm, focusing on due diligence and operation integrations for some of its technology portfolio companies.) Based in Boise, Idaho — which is home to a thriving tech community of its own — Amy has two children and lives with her husband and an English Mastiff named Scout in a fixer-upper in Boise's historic north end. Ms. Bailey is an original tomboy and enjoys all that the Idaho outdoors offers. She spends as much spare time as she can on a bike on a country ride or in the mountains, and cooks and bakes like a champ—the ultimate way to earn back those lost calories.

Please visit http://tsheets.com for more information.

Ms. Bailey can be contacted at 888-836-2720 or amy@tsheets.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.