Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Heinicke

Krista Heinicke

PR Manager for Food & Beverage, The Broadmoor

Krista Heinicke is a former international athletic competitor, avid foodie and tireless public relations professional. Ms. Heinicke has been a member of The Broadmoor family since 2009 and prior to that, she held numerous roles in the hospitality industry. Growing up in Michigan and holding her first job at age 11 in the family McDonald’s business and having a mother who majored in Food and Nutrition, food and beverage held a common thread and comforting guide in her life. Ms. Heinicke graduated from the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs with a Communications degree and simultaneously co owned a fine dining French restaurant Chez Pierre in downtown Colorado Springs. Never allowing grass to grow under her feet, she started a family and moved onto the world of retail and hospitality with Williams Sonoma. An opportunity arose to jump back into Public Relations where she worked with a small PR firm in Manitou Springs that specialized in equestrian and celebrity writing where she spent 4 years. As life takes unexpected turns, Ms. Heinicke went back to where she originally started her life in Colorado Springs, The Broadmoor. She has worked in all aspects of hospitality from sales to concierge to restaurant owner and Public Relations Manager for Food and Beverage for The Broadmoor. Securing clients stories in such publications as The Wall Street Journal, Town and Country Magazine as well as entertaining travel writers from Cooking Light, Chicago Tribune, Ms. Heinicke knows what it takes to build long lasting and trusting professional relationships. Please visit http://www.thebroadmoor.com for more information.

Ms. Heinicke can be contacted at 719-471-6188 or kheinicke@thebroadmoor.com

Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.