Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Gallagher

Bram Gallagher

Economist, CBRE Hotels' Americas Research

Bram Gallagher is an Economist for CBRE Hotels' Americas Research, the Americas research arm of the world's largest commercial real estate firm. He maintains performance forecasting models for 60 major U.S. hotel markets, performs consulting work for a destination marketing organization, creates tools for hotel developers, and examines the effects natural disasters have on hotel occupancy.  His background in statistical modeling and understanding of how markets operate have allowed him to reveal powerful, new insight into the future of the lodging industry.

After earning his PhD in Economics with a focus in Econometrics from the University of Georgia in 2011, Mr. Gallagher worked as a professor at Middle Tennessee State University and Berry College. Taking his expertise in microeconomic and econometric theory with him, he left the academy for a research position in the lodging industry in 2015 to better learn how economics is practiced.

His research interests are in analyzing hotel performance data combined with local and national economic data to produce actionable intelligence for the hotel manager, investor and developer. He believes that reducing and characterizing uncertainty around future outcomes spurs present decisions.

Mr. Gallagher has presented his findings on occupancy taxes to AAHOA, a paper on natural occupancy and rental adjustment at the conference of the American Real Estate Society, and thoughts on novel forecasting methods to his colleagues. He has had his research published in several CBRE reports, as well as in Hotel News Now. He has also published a generalization of the Arrow-Lind Theorem in the Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research.

Please visit http://www.cbre.com for more information.

Mr. Gallagher can be contacted at +1 404-812-5189 or bram.gallagher@cbre.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.