Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Gallagher

Bram Gallagher

Economist, CBRE Hotels' Americas Research

Bram Gallagher is an Economist for CBRE Hotels' Americas Research, the Americas research arm of the world's largest commercial real estate firm. He maintains performance forecasting models for 60 major U.S. hotel markets, performs consulting work for a destination marketing organization, creates tools for hotel developers, and examines the effects natural disasters have on hotel occupancy. His background in statistical modeling and understanding of how markets operate have allowed him to reveal powerful, new insight into the future of the lodging industry. After earning his PhD in Economics with a focus in Econometrics from the University of Georgia in 2011, Mr. Gallagher worked as a professor at Middle Tennessee State University and Berry College. Taking his expertise in microeconomic and econometric theory with him, he left the academy for a research position in the lodging industry in 2015 to better learn how economics is practiced. His research interests are in analyzing hotel performance data combined with local and national economic data to produce actionable intelligence for the hotel manager, investor and developer. He believes that reducing and characterizing uncertainty around future outcomes spurs present decisions. Mr. Gallagher has presented his findings on occupancy taxes to AAHOA, a paper on natural occupancy and rental adjustment at the conference of the American Real Estate Society, and thoughts on novel forecasting methods to his colleagues. He has had his research published in several CBRE reports, as well as in Hotel News Now. He has also published a generalization of the Arrow-Lind Theorem in the Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research.

Please visit http://www.cbre.com for more information.

Mr. Gallagher can be contacted at 404-812-5189 or bram.gallagher@cbre.com

Coming up in January 2019...

Mobile Technology: The Future is Now

Mobile Technology continues to advance at a relentless pace and the hotel industry continues to adapt. Hotel guests have shown a strong preference for mobile self-service - from checking-in/out at a hotel kiosk, to ordering room service, making dinner reservations, booking spa treatments, and managing laundry/dry cleaning services. And they also enjoy the convenience of paying for these services with smart phone mobile payments. In addition, some hotels have adopted a “concierge in your pocket” concept. Through a proprietary hotel app, guests can access useful information such as local entertainment venues, tourist attractions, event calendars, and medical facilities and services. In-room entertainment continues to be a key factor, as guests insist on the capacity to plug in their own mobile devices to customize their entertainment choices. Mobile technology also allows for greater marketing opportunities. For example, many hotels have adopted the use of “push notifications” - sending promotions, discounts and special event messages to guests based on their property location, purchase history, profiles, etc. Near field communication (NFC) technology is also being utilized to support applications such as opening room doors, earning loyalty points, renting a bike, accessing a rental car, and more. Finally, some hotels have adopted more futuristic technology. Robots are in use that have the ability to move between floors to deliver room service requests for all kinds of items - food, beverages, towels, toothbrushes, chargers and snacks. And infrared scanners are being used by housekeeping staff that can detect body heat within a room, alerting staff that the room is occupied and they should come back at a later time. The January Hotel Business Review will report on what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in this exciting mobile technology space.