Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Bolf

Brian Bolf

VP of Revenue and Profit Optimization, Kokua Hospitality

As vice president of revenue and profit optimization, Brian Bolf is responsible for revenue management and e-Commerce at Kokua Hospitality. Mr. Bolf is a collaborative, trusted leader who is valued for his holistic and transparent approach to assisting properties reach their optimal performance levels. He works closely with the hotel executive teams, asset management groups, and owners to properly align customized efforts to reach a unified goal at each property. Through his twenty-five plus years of experience in the industry across a multitude of independent and branded hotels, he has specialized in process improvement and utilizing data analytics to creatively develop profit opportunities for the portfolio. Leading the charge of Kokua’s recently developed revenue management platform, Mr. Bolf is focused on maintaining a true advantage above the competition. He employs a strategic approach to understanding market trends and customer behavior that is both progressive and insightful. Before joining Kokua Hospitality in 2007, Mr. Bolf worked with numerous hotel brands that included Hard Rock Hotels, Omni Hotels, Hilton Hotels Worldwide, and Preferred Hotels & Resorts. Prior to turning his focus to hotel revenue management, Mr. Bolf worked at Solo Cup Company as a senior global accountant, responsible for the financial reporting of six foreign entities, totaling to two billion in annual revenues. Mr. Bolf graduated from Loyola University Chicago with a bachelor of science degree in psychology and finance and holds an A.A.S. degree in marketing. Please visit http://www.kokuahospitality.com for more information.

Mr. Bolf can be contacted at 312-644-4800 or brian.bolf@kokuahospitality.com

Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.