Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Lucas

Sarah Lucas

CEO & Founder, Action for Dolphins

In 2012 Sarah Lucas made a life-altering trip to Japan to volunteer as a monitor of the dolphin hunts in Taiji. This prompted her to create Action for Dolphins (AFD) with the mission of protecting dolphins from the cruelty of dolphin hunting and captivity. Action for Dolphins uses strategic litigation and legislative reform in an effort to protect cetaceans (dolphins and small whales), which do not receive any international legal protection and are killed in their thousands in inhumane hunts. In 2015 AFD took global legal action which resulted in 63 Japanese aquariums being prohibited from purchasing dolphins captured in the world's largest dolphin hunts in Taiji, Japan and this was a major contribution to the growing preservation of dolphins. In 2016, AFD launched a national campaign to abolish dolphin captivity in Australia. The campaign is spearheaded by former NSW Premier the Hon Bob Carr, and aims to introduce new legislation banning dolphin captivity in Australia. The longer-term aim of the campaign is to establish a world-first sea sanctuary in Australia where captive dolphins can be retired and injured dolphins can be rehabilitated. Prior to founding AFD Ms. Lucas worked in the communications department of the International Finance Corporation in Paris and completed a professional fellowship at the United Nations in New York. She graduated with a Master's in International Relations from the University of Cambridge in 2010. In her spare time Sarah is a freelance writer, and has contributed articles to publications such as The Australian. Ms. Lucas is passionate about animal welfare and is involved in several organizations, including Lola ya Bonobo, the world's only bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Please visit http//:www.afd.org.au for more information.

Ms. Lucas can be contacted at 447475873050 or sarah@afd.org.au

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.