Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Lucas

Sarah Lucas

CEO & Founder, Action for Dolphins

In 2012 Sarah Lucas made a life-altering trip to Japan to volunteer as a monitor of the dolphin hunts in Taiji. This prompted her to create Action for Dolphins (AFD) with the mission of protecting dolphins from the cruelty of dolphin hunting and captivity. Action for Dolphins uses strategic litigation and legislative reform in an effort to protect cetaceans (dolphins and small whales), which do not receive any international legal protection and are killed in their thousands in inhumane hunts. In 2015 AFD took global legal action which resulted in 63 Japanese aquariums being prohibited from purchasing dolphins captured in the world's largest dolphin hunts in Taiji, Japan and this was a major contribution to the growing preservation of dolphins. In 2016, AFD launched a national campaign to abolish dolphin captivity in Australia. The campaign is spearheaded by former NSW Premier the Hon Bob Carr, and aims to introduce new legislation banning dolphin captivity in Australia. The longer-term aim of the campaign is to establish a world-first sea sanctuary in Australia where captive dolphins can be retired and injured dolphins can be rehabilitated. Prior to founding AFD Ms. Lucas worked in the communications department of the International Finance Corporation in Paris and completed a professional fellowship at the United Nations in New York. She graduated with a Master's in International Relations from the University of Cambridge in 2010. In her spare time Sarah is a freelance writer, and has contributed articles to publications such as The Australian. Ms. Lucas is passionate about animal welfare and is involved in several organizations, including Lola ya Bonobo, the world's only bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Please visit http//:www.afd.org.au for more information.

Ms. Lucas can be contacted at +44 7475 873 050 or sarah@afd.org.au

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.