Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Seay

Lisa Seay

Founder, Element C

Lisa Seay is on a mission to help individuals find their professional purpose (and power!) and help companies develop cost-effective, efficient and sustainable talent management strategies. As founder of the coaching/consulting firm element c, Ms. Seay leverages her HR background to provide individual and team coaching, leadership development and team building services.

By working in myriad environments during her 25-year corporate career—including startups, mergers and acquisitions, franchised organizations and large entities with multi-state locations—she knows firsthand how challenging organizational situations impact workforce performance, employee engagement and personal career growth. Prior to launching element c in 2015, Ms. Seay held talent management and HR director roles in a variety of organizations, including A.T. Kearney, YUM! Brands and Baylor Health Care System. During Ms. Seay's tenure at Yum! Brands/Pizza Hut, Inc., she managed a $500K employee marketing initiative that attracted 250,000+ job seekers to the company's new online application system in three months.

Most recently, she served as a National Director of Human Resources at Conifer Health Solutions in Frisco, Texas, where she led a team that supported 3,000+ employees. In the book Humans@Work, Ms. Seay joined with other HR professionals to address some of the top challenges employers face in today's marketplace. In her chapter, Elements of the Lost and Found Spirit, Ms. Seay explores how to identify when one has lost their uniqueness when it comes to their work and what leaders can do to support those individuals in being their best at work. A proponent of life-long learning,

Ms. Seay holds a Graduate Certificate in Executive Coaching from the University of Texas at Dallas and is a Certified Lumina Learning Practitioner. Ms. Seay lives outside Dallas with her husband, Brian, who works in the financial services industry, and their young daughters. She is the New Family Liaison at her children's school and also serves on the personnel committee at her church.

Please visit http://www.theelementc.com for more information.

Ms. Seay can be contacted at 214-394-7308 or lisa@theelementc.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.