Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Moniz

Rachel Moniz

Executive Vice President of Operations, HEI Hotels & Resorts

Rachel Moniz is the Executive Vice President of Operations for HEI Hotels + Resorts, overseeing the hotel operating group to implement strategic plans, maximize operating performance and meet financial goals across HEI's portfolio.

Prior to this, Ms. Moniz was the Senior Vice President of Luxury, Lifestyle & Independent Brands & Food & Beverage at HEI Hotels & Resorts where she worked on several independently and soft branded properties to define the brand identity and positioning of the hotel within the market, leading the branding and marketing initiatives for all aspects of HEI's Independent Brands Portfolio, including: The Liberty, a Luxury Collection Hotel, Boston; The Gwen, a Luxury Collection Hotel, Chicago; Hotel Crescent Court (Dallas) The Whitley, A Luxury Collection Hotel, Atlanta Buckhead; Hotel Republic (San Diego); The Stoneleigh (Dallas); and Hotel Crescent Court (Dallas).

Via creative and compelling branding initiatives, Ms. Moniz promotes the luxury accommodations and attentive service, prime location and community relationships, unique story angles, and exciting food and beverage outlets at these distinctive properties. By creating customized associate service culture training, she is able to orientate the individual property teams with their hotel's brand DNA and the delivery of the brand message through empathy, trip personas, and overall emotional connections with guests.

A New England native, Ms. Moniz grew up in Connecticut and New York. After graduating Wheelock College in Boston, she started her hospitality career at the Sheraton Boston in 1995. Almost 15 years later, she returned to Boston with valuable familiarity with boutique, distinctive properties like the extraordinary Liberty Hotel. As general manager of The Liberty, Ms. Moniz was the creative force behind the hotel's weekly complimentary programming "Liberty Affairs", which has become a fixture in the Boston community.

In 2006, Ms. Moniz opened the celebrated Ivy Hotel in San Diego, California. As part of the pre-opening team, she launched the luxury hotel and popular nightclub to national acclaim. During her three year tenure as Hotel Manager at the Ivy, she built the infrastructure of the hotel's operations team and managed day-to-day hotel business and guest relations.

Prior to the Ivy, Ms. Moniz was the Director of Operations at the W hotel, also in San Diego. Previously, she lived in Colorado and was a hotel executive with St. Regis Aspen.

Ms. Moniz co-founded HEI's Women in Leadership program, where she works to advance gender parity in key leadership roles.

Please visit http://www.heihotels.com for more information.

Ms. Moniz can be contacted at +1 617-838-2422 or rmoniz@heihotels.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.