Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Hitchcock

Amanda Hitchcock

Copywriter, BCF Agency

“It's Hitchcock, like Alfred.”

That's likely the response you'll get if you ask Amanda Hitchcock for her name. We still don't know if she's actually related to the Horror-Film Legend, but if she inherited anything from her namesake, it'd be a fierce determination— and a knack for storytelling.


Ms. Hitchcock's on-the-move childhood made home a difficult thing for her to define. As years passed and as locations continued to change, she practiced artistic expression with relentless refinement, driven by a deep fondness for the empathetic truth found in conceptual understanding. To Ms. Hitchcock, that simplicity, seeing oneself in the story of another, was belonging. This, she decided, was home.


Today, she approaches the blank page with all the ambition of a Horror-Film Legend, aiming to present content through the right lens; to catch the critical tilt— that unexpected, essential, impactful angle through which a story becomes truth, a idea ascends to canon, and a young girl, searching for belonging and determined to connect people around the world, hears the words, “Welcome home.”


Ms. Hitchcock achieved the status of a published writer well before obtaining her college degree. She delivers a list of notable work across a variety of national and international publications, along with a dynamic editorial career and diverse professional network. Today, she's brought her passion for creative expression and engagement to the advertising industry as a Copywriter for BCF Agency. From screenwriting to social media campaign development, Ms. Hitchcock has crafted content across all screen sizes for a diverse collection of travel-tourism, destination, lifestyle, and hospitality brands nationwide. 

Please visit http://www.bcfagency.com for more information.

Ms. Hitchcock can be contacted at 757-497-4811 or amandahitchcock.media@gmail.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.