Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Hartz

Jay Hartz

President, Next Generation Revenue Per Available Room

When you take a hotel that no one could turn a profit on and make the red ink disappear, most hoteliers would agree you have a recipe for success.

Jay Hartz, CHA, purchased the distressed Hotel Pattee in Perry, Iowa in 2013. With a long history of dealing with and succeeding in insolvency situations, Mr. Hartz believed he had what it took to turn the iconic property around. In 12 short months, the hotel was in the black, and in early 2018, he sold the thriving property in order to take his turnaround strategy on the road.

Today, Mr. Hartz is the President of Next Generation Revenue Per Available Room, which is a consulting and training firm focusing on helping hotels reach their full revenue potential. His NextGenRevPar Professional Sales Training Program has been designed after 30 years of hotel industry expertise with many of the major international brands including Marriott, IHG, Hilton Choice and Wyndham. The model focuses on an eight-week training program followed by ongoing weekly support, because he firmly believes repetition is what drives successful results. The NextGenRevPar program incorporates three key factors: 1) Owning a “hotel specific” sales model; 2) Decreasing sales turnover; and 3) Maximizing revenue potential.

Mr. Hartz is passionate about helping salespeople develop their skill set and his proprietary “Hartz Hotel Selling Institute” is unparalleled in our industry as it provides an innovative approach to lead generation, prospecting, and shifting business from competitors.

Mr. Hartz graduated from the University of Missouri - Saint Louis with a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) Business Administration and Management General.


Please visit http://www.nextgenrevpar.com for more information.

Mr. Hartz can be contacted at 515-802-8280 or jay@nextgenrevpar.com

Coming up in August 2019...

Food & Beverage: Millennial Chefs Lead the Way

Led by Millennial chefs, hotels continue to foster sustainability, sourcing and wellness within their dining rooms and banquet spaces, and by all measures, this is responsible for an increase in their revenues. In many hotels, the food & beverage division contributes 50 per cent or more to hotel sales and they are currently experiencing double-digit growth. As a result, hotel owners are allocating an increasing amount of square footage for F&B operations. The biggest area of investment is in catering, which is thriving due to weddings, social events and business conferences. Hotels are also investing in on-site market or convenience stores that offer fresh/refrigerated foods, and buffet concepts also continue to expand. Other popular food trends include a rise of fermented offerings such as kombucha, kimchi, sauerkraut, tempeh, kefir and pickles - all to produce the least processed food possible, and to boost probiotics to improve the immune system. Tea is also enjoying something of a renaissance. More people are thinking of tea with the same reverence as coffee due to its many varieties, applications and benefits. Craft tea blending, nitro tea on tap and even tea cocktails are beginning to appear on some hotel menus. Another trend concerns creating a unique, individualized and memorable experience for guests. This could be a small consumable item that is specific to a property or event, such as house-made snack mixes, gourmet popcorn, macaroons, or jars of house-made jams, chutneys, and mustards -all produced and customized in house. One staple that is in decline is the in-room minibar which seems to have fallen out of favor. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.