Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Hartz

Jay Hartz

President, Next Generation Revenue Per Available Room

When you take a hotel that no one could turn a profit on and make the red ink disappear, most hoteliers would agree you have a recipe for success.

Jay Hartz, CHA, purchased the distressed Hotel Pattee in Perry, Iowa in 2013. With a long history of dealing with and succeeding in insolvency situations, Mr. Hartz believed he had what it took to turn the iconic property around. In 12 short months, the hotel was in the black, and in early 2018, he sold the thriving property in order to take his turnaround strategy on the road.

Today, Mr. Hartz is the President of Next Generation Revenue Per Available Room, which is a consulting and training firm focusing on helping hotels reach their full revenue potential. His NextGenRevPar Professional Sales Training Program has been designed after 30 years of hotel industry expertise with many of the major international brands including Marriott, IHG, Hilton Choice and Wyndham. The model focuses on an eight-week training program followed by ongoing weekly support, because he firmly believes repetition is what drives successful results. The NextGenRevPar program incorporates three key factors: 1) Owning a “hotel specific” sales model; 2) Decreasing sales turnover; and 3) Maximizing revenue potential.

Mr. Hartz is passionate about helping salespeople develop their skill set and his proprietary “Hartz Hotel Selling Institute” is unparalleled in our industry as it provides an innovative approach to lead generation, prospecting, and shifting business from competitors.

Mr. Hartz graduated from the University of Missouri - Saint Louis with a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) Business Administration and Management General.


Please visit http://www.nextgenrevpar.com for more information.

Mr. Hartz can be contacted at 515-802-8280 or jay@nextgenrevpar.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.