Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Hartz

Jay Hartz

President, Next Generation Revenue Per Available Room

When you take a hotel that no one could turn a profit on and make the red ink disappear, most hoteliers would agree you have a recipe for success.

Jay Hartz, CHA, purchased the distressed Hotel Pattee in Perry, Iowa in 2013. With a long history of dealing with and succeeding in insolvency situations, Mr. Hartz believed he had what it took to turn the iconic property around. In 12 short months, the hotel was in the black, and in early 2018, he sold the thriving property in order to take his turnaround strategy on the road.

Today, Mr. Hartz is the President of Next Generation Revenue Per Available Room, which is a consulting and training firm focusing on helping hotels reach their full revenue potential. His NextGenRevPar Professional Sales Training Program has been designed after 30 years of hotel industry expertise with many of the major international brands including Marriott, IHG, Hilton Choice and Wyndham. The model focuses on an eight-week training program followed by ongoing weekly support, because he firmly believes repetition is what drives successful results. The NextGenRevPar program incorporates three key factors: 1) Owning a “hotel specific” sales model; 2) Decreasing sales turnover; and 3) Maximizing revenue potential.

Mr. Hartz is passionate about helping salespeople develop their skill set and his proprietary “Hartz Hotel Selling Institute” is unparalleled in our industry as it provides an innovative approach to lead generation, prospecting, and shifting business from competitors.

Mr. Hartz graduated from the University of Missouri - Saint Louis with a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) Business Administration and Management General.


Please visit http://www.nextgenrevpar.com for more information.

Mr. Hartz can be contacted at 515-802-8280 or jay@nextgenrevpar.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.