Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Liebman

Bruce Liebman

Co-Managing Partner, Kaufman Dolowich & Voluck LLP

Bruce S. Liebman is co-managing partner in the Ft. Lauderdale and Boca Raton offices of Kaufman Dolowich & Voluck LLP, experienced in the representation of international and domestic hospitality companies and casinos in the area of liability, collections and gaming issues.

Mr. Liebman has over 20 reported cases on jurisdictional, venue selection and forum non conveniens issues from Federal Courts across the nation. He also has more than 20 years of experience practicing in the areas of labor and employment law, representing management in hundreds of matters before federal and state agencies and in federal and state court.

Mr. Liebman has worked with dozens of EPLI, E&O, and D&O carriers in the representation of their insureds and works closely with clients to help them navigate the myriad of laws and regulations that govern the workplace, while defending them when necessary before agencies and in court. His practice includes defending medical professionals, lawyers, accountants, and insurance agents in malpractice and E&O claims. 

Mr. Liebman can be contacted at 954-302-2397 or bliebman@kdvlaw.com

Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.