Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Williamson

Mark Williamson

CEO, PHMG

Mark Williamson is CEO of PHMG, a world-leading, award-winning audio branding agency with more than 32,000 clients in 39 countries. 

Mr Williamson has been with the company since 2004, working with clients across the globe to develop their unique sound strategy. Originally Sales and Marketing Director in the UK, he draws on 20 years of experience to advice businesses in every sector on the best way to incorporate audio into their wider marketing strategy - ensuring companies sound every bit as good as they look through music composition, voice artistry and creative scriptwriting. 

Mr Williamson was integral in the company's expansion into the USA, helping to open the organization's North American headquarters in Chicago in 2016. As well as the UK and US, he has also helped build a presence for PHMG in Canada, Singapore and Australia. 

Over the last five years, Mr Williamson has been fundraising for PHMG's charitable arm, the PHMG Foundation, helping to raise almost $370,000 for almost 70 different organizations around the world. His latest activity was a gruelling 798-step tower climb, raising $5,616 for in the process.

Please visit www.phmg.com for more information.

Mr. Williamson can be contacted at 0800 408 1451 or mark.williamson@phmg.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.