Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Cordle

Dianna Cordle

Director of Sales, Holiday Inn Dayton Fairborn

Dianna Cordle always found that the key to success is providing exceptional customer service. The hotel industry has been a rewarding and challenging career path. Along her journey she has worn many hats in this ever-changing arena.

Currently in her role as the Director of Sales at the Holiday Inn Dayton Fairborn in Greene County, Ohio, her job responsibilities continue to have a broad variety of challenges. Working and developing a cohesive and experience team is ultimately her first priority. Combining team members goals with positive RGI makes for a dynamic solid hotel.

Throughout her career Ms. Cordle has felt it has been very important to support the community. Her involvement with local groups and organizations has spanned over 20 years. She has assisted with the planning of events from military reunion groups, local charities and the business community. She is constantly focused on promoting the Greene County area and the many opportunities offered.

Ms. Cordle's experience in developing connections with individuals and groups visiting Greene County continues to promote a healthy growing economy. Her strong commitment to Greene County has developed over her career. Currently she is serving on the Beavercreek Chamber Board as well as the Greene County Convention & Visitors Board.

As a leader, Ms. Cordle encourages her team within the company to be involved with Habitat for Humanity, Greene Leads, Michael's house, Greene Giving, Feed the Creek and the local USO. By giving back and supporting these local organizations, she has learned that this provides a wealth of knowledge and connections.


Please visit http://www.hidaytonfairborn.com for more information.

Ms. Cordle can be contacted at 937-431-4612 or Dianna.Cordle@hidaytonofairborn.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.