Editorial Board   

Mr. Trainor

Robert Trainor

Exec Chef, Hilton

Robert Trainor is executive chef of Hilton Short Hills, New Jersey's premier urban resort that is home to the state's only Five Diamond restaurant, The Dining Room. He manages all aspects of menu and meal preparation, staffing and training in the hotel's restaurants, including The Dining Room, the hotel's more casual venue, The Terrace, The Retreat Lounge, room service and all banquets. Long respected as one of the New York metro area's finest chefs, Trainor took the helm at New Jersey's premier urban resort in November 2003. Trainor is well acquainted with the recipe for mixing culinary excitement with companionable comfort. As Executive Sous Chef at the legendary Waldorf=Astoria, his first assignment was to retool the menu of the beloved Oscar's, while maintaining the elements of the restaurant's unique tradition. Raised in Rhode Island and educated at Johnson & Wales University, Trainor's numerous achievements include being named one of the top 100 chefs in America by the Taste Institute of America in 1998, becoming a certified sommelier through the American Sommelier Association, serving as the 95th Distinguished Visiting Chef of Johnson & Wales University, and garnering numerous gold and silver medals in international culinary competitions. He has also cooked as guest chef at the James Beard House and in the home of the late culinary legend Julia Child

Mr. Trainor can be contacted at 973 912 7974 or Robert_Trainor@Hilton.com

Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.