Editorial Board   

Mr. Trainor

Robert Trainor

Exec Chef, Hilton

Robert Trainor is executive chef of Hilton Short Hills, New Jersey's premier urban resort that is home to the state's only Five Diamond restaurant, The Dining Room. He manages all aspects of menu and meal preparation, staffing and training in the hotel's restaurants, including The Dining Room, the hotel's more casual venue, The Terrace, The Retreat Lounge, room service and all banquets. Long respected as one of the New York metro area's finest chefs, Trainor took the helm at New Jersey's premier urban resort in November 2003. Trainor is well acquainted with the recipe for mixing culinary excitement with companionable comfort. As Executive Sous Chef at the legendary Waldorf=Astoria, his first assignment was to retool the menu of the beloved Oscar's, while maintaining the elements of the restaurant's unique tradition. Raised in Rhode Island and educated at Johnson & Wales University, Trainor's numerous achievements include being named one of the top 100 chefs in America by the Taste Institute of America in 1998, becoming a certified sommelier through the American Sommelier Association, serving as the 95th Distinguished Visiting Chef of Johnson & Wales University, and garnering numerous gold and silver medals in international culinary competitions. He has also cooked as guest chef at the James Beard House and in the home of the late culinary legend Julia Child

Mr. Trainor can be contacted at 973 912 7974 or Robert_Trainor@Hilton.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.