Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Blair

Ed Blair

General Manager, The Curtis - A Doubletree by Hilton

Ed Blair is the "Rebel Leader" or General Manager of the Curtis - a Doubletree by Hilton, Denver's only hotel dedicated to pop culture where all guests are encouraged to "Stay Happy."

With more than 22 years of hospitality experience, Mr. Blair previously served as the General Manager at Sage's Embassy Suites Denver Downtown, where he was honored with the "Sage Passion Award" for 2017.

He also spent almost a decade as the General Manager of The Oxford Hotel, where he was named "Leader of the Year" in 2012. Under his direction, The Oxford was also honored as Sage's the "Hotel of the Year" in 2011, based on its strong financials, market share, guest, employee and audit metrics.

A graduate of the University of Colorado at Boulder, Mr. Blair also previously served as the Chief Operating Officer of the Mile High United Way and an Associate Pastor at Colorado's NorthPoint Covenant Church. He is a founding member of Denver's Road to Work Business Advisory Council, which provides training and employment opportunities for people suffering from poverty and those with disabilities, and also serves on the board of Denver's 14th Street General Improvement District.

Managed by Denver's Sage Hospitality - one of the nation's top hotel investment and management companies - the Curtis was recently named one the "6 Best Hotels in Downtown Denver" by FODOR'S. The Curtis offers 336 modern guest rooms featuring custom art, sleek furniture and a Hilton Sweet Dreams Bed and more than 28,000 total square feet of playful urban event space, all named after favorite childhood games.

Please visit http://www.hilton.com for more information.

Mr. Blair can be contacted at +1 303-571-0300 or ed.blair@hilton.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.