Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Tardy

Herve Tardy

VP & GM, Distributed Power Infrastructure Division (Americas), Eaton

Herve Tardy is Vice President and General Manager of Eaton's Distributed Power Infrastructure business unit. In this role, Mr. Tardy manages the Americas product roadmap for power solutions, software and connectivity products to reinforce Eaton's technology leadership. He also has responsibility for the Eaton IT channel, working closely with IT resellers and managed service providers to design strategies that drive recurring revenue opportunities for a range of end markets.

Mr. Tardy is a 30-year veteran of the uninterruptible power system (UPS) industry and has held multiple positions in sales, channel marketing, marketing communications, product marketing and product development.

At Eaton, he has closely watched shifts in the IT landscape that continue to have an impact on the hotel industry, including: the emergence of cloud and hybrid models for managing IT workloads; the rise of edge computing and distributed IT; and the evolution of cybersecurity as the Internet-of-Things and increased connectivity have created new opportunities for cyber threats.

Additionally, he continues to work with Eaton's customers across industries to provide reliable backup power solutions to ensure business continuity in the event of outages or other unplanned power events.

Ultimately, through integration with Eaton Alliance Partners such as VMware, Cisco, Microsoft and Nutanix, Mr. Tardy works with IT solution providers to align their power management strategies in a way that anticipates emerging technology trends and prepares end customers to meet tomorrow's challenges.

Mr. Tardy is based in Raleigh, North Carolina, and he graduated from the ESSEC Business School in Paris, France, and the Stanford Executive Program.

Please visit http://powerquality.eaton.com/USA for more information.

Mr. Tardy can be contacted at HerveTardy@Eaton.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.