Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Skinker

Rick Skinker

Managing Director & Co-Founder, Indoor Water Conservation

Rick Skinker has a Master's degree in Finance from the University of Southern California and has obtained several certifications related to corporate restructuring. During a successful career as a turnaround consultant, he travelled continuously on a weekly basis for more than 25 years, staying in hotels throughout the US, Mexico and Canada. Using showers and sinks in different properties in different cities for that amount of time gave him an appreciation for good flows and bad flows in all categories of hotels.

In 2013, he had the opportunity to become an equity partner in a firm that had a patent on a device that controlled the flow of water in showers and sinks. He dove into understanding the market for these products and began to further develop the methodology used at the time to fit these devices in different applications. In 2015, together with Ken Leddon, they started Indoor Water Conservation. They developed technology that evolved into understanding what causes unbalanced flows in showers and sinks and developed a process to balance them. By working with customers before, during and after the installation of Flow Limiting technology, they have created the most advanced understanding of balanced flows and their benefits, both to hotels and their guests.

Mr. Skinker is passionate about Water Conservation and the continuous development of flow limiting technology and its impact on reducing and controlling costs while improving guest satisfaction. He lives with his wife, Elaine in San Diego and has four children and six grandchildren.

Please visit http://www.indoorwaterconservation.com for more information.

Mr. Skinker can be contacted at +1 619-392-8961 or rskinker@indoorh2o.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.