Editorial Board   Guest Author

Dr. Tabacchi

Mary Tabacchi

Professor Emerita, Cornell University School of Hotel Administration

Mary Tabacchi, PhD, RD is a Professor Emerita, at Cornell University, School of Hotel Administration and Johnson School of Management. She was a long term employee teaching in Cornell's Division of Nutritional Sciences in 1972 and as a research associate in Post- Harvest studies in Plant Science until 1978.

Dr. Tabacchi entered academic spa work in the early 1980s, working with Deborah Szekely at the Golden Door & Rancho La Puerta and Jerry Cohen and Mel Zuckerman with Canyon Ranch as well as with Sheila Cluff at the Oaks at Ojai. At Cornell University she helped found the Cornell Institute of Healthy Futures.

Dr.. Tabacchi is a Founder and member of Board of Advisors for Global Wellness Summit, Founder and Member of the Board of New York Spa Alliance, Founder and former Board Member of ISPA, Member of the Board of Green Spa Network and Advisor to the Ronald McDonald House in NYC. She and her students have completed projects with Hyatt, Mandarin Oriental, Banyan Tree, Hilton, Four Seasons, Six Senses, Mirbeau, Red Door Spas, The Spa at Norwich Inn and Mohonk Mountain House.

Dr. Tabacchi taught the first academic spa development course in 1987 and also the first academic Corporate Wellness Course in 1988. As a nutrition educator, she taught biochemical nutrition in Cornell's Division of Nutritional Science and Healthful Cuisine at the Hotel School. She still mentors students and former students, world- wide.

Dr. Tabacchi is an ardent hiker, power yogini, world- wide adventure traveler having hiked in Tanzania, Grand Canyon, The Greek Isles, Provence in France, Israel and Jordan, Sailed and hiked in the Galapagos and mid- June will hike to 15,000 ft in the Andes and descend to Machu Picchu.

Please visit http://www.cornell.edu for more information.

Dr. Tabacchi can be contacted at +1 607-255-3458 or mht3@cornell.edu

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.