Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Nelson

Brad Nelson

Vice President Global F&B Portfolio, Culinary Discipline, Marriott

Brad Nelson has spent the last 40 years in hospitality, crossing through the hotel business and restaurant since his first real job as a night line cook at a Hilton in his hometown of suburban Seattle. His role in the industry spans from corporate to independent, having led above-property teams in a Southern Cal ten-unit restaurant chain and the 7,000 property strong global hotel giant.

Chef Nelson joined Marriott in 1998 after having spent time with luxury operator Fairmont Hotels, the California desert's La Quinta Resort and Club, and ITT Sheraton's pacific division on the Big Island of Hawaii, among others. He likes to say that all of those experiences merely prepared him for his current role, leading the food and beverage culinary strategy for Marriott's 30 brands worldwide.

In 2003 Chef Nelson was named VP Culinary. Over the last 16 years, Chef Nelson has led key priorities with his efforts on sustainable seafood, transfats elimination, animal welfare, food safety, and now plastics and food waste.

Overseeing 30 brands across luxury, premium, and select service segments, Chef Nelson leads a robust team, whose mandate is to constantly challenge food and beverage norms. Chef Nelson also uses his platform to give back, having raised over $ 5 million for the People with Disabilities charity foundation, Service Source Foundation, where Chef Nelson is a board trustee member.

Industry accolades include being named 2014 Silver Plate Foodservice Operator of the Year by the International Food Manufacturers Association; recipient of Food Arts Magazine November 2012 Silver Spoon; judging the NRA'S FABI innovation award. Chef Nelson is a regular at many industry events, having spoken at Cornell's annual Ezra event, CIA Flavors conferences, and man.

A 1984 graduate of the Culinary Institute of America and recipient of the Richard T. Keating Award, he is a member of the Seafood Watch Foodservice Roundtable, International Corporate Chefs Association, James Beard Foundation, and CIA Alumni.

Please visit http://www.marriott.com for more information.

Mr. Nelson can be contacted at +1 301-380-4646 or brad.nelson@marriott.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.