Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Ogdie

Joe Ogdie

General Manager, The Lodge at Blue Sky, Auberge Resorts Collection

Joe Ogdie serves as the General Manager of The Lodge at Blue Sky, Auberge Resorts Collection, a luxury resort located just outside Park City, Utah in the Wasatch Mountain Range. In his role, Mr. Ogdie oversees the daily operations of the resort, which encompasses 46 rooms and suites, The Edge Spa, signature restaurant Yuta led by James Beard Award-winning Chef Galen Zamarra. The High West Distillery and countless outdoor activities, such as heli-skiing, horseback riding and kids' programs seek to connect guests with the expansive 3,500-acre mountain paradise.

An experienced luxury hospitality professional, Mr. Ogdie has spent his career working in key management positions with globally recognized hotel brands. Before joining The Lodge at Blue Sky team, Mr. Ogdie served as Interim General Manager at Calistoga Ranch, Auberge Resorts Collection, the luxurious private canyon hideaway in Napa Valley, California. Prior to that, he served as Director of Operations and Director of Food and Beverage at Solage, Auberge Resorts Collection, Napa Valley's spirited property designed for foodies and wellness seekers. Mr. Ogdie began his career with Four Seasons, working across properties in Hawaii, New York and Florida.

Mr. Ogdie holds a degree in hospitality management from Baltimore International College. An outdoor enthusiast with a passion for food and wine. Mr. Ogdie spends his free time skiing and cooking. When traveling, he loves to visit exotic locales where he can experience the destination's food and beverage scene one restaurant at a time, with a preference for places off the beaten path.

Please visit http://www.aubergeresorts.com/bluesky for more information.

Mr. Ogdie can be contacted at +1 435-571-0349 or joe.ogdie@aubergeresorts.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.