Editorial Board   

Mr. Ortiz

Joseph Ortiz

President, IPIX InfoMedia

Joseph L. Ortiz is a technology development and commercialization consultant with over 20 years of experience in driving innovations to the marketplace. He most recently was Officer and Vice President at IPIX Corporation, where he was managing director of their InfoMedia business unit. Mr. Ortiz defined the unit's strategic vision and business plan, restarting the IPIX Virtual Tour Photography and Movies business that represented the foundation of Internet Pictures Corporation's $72M NASDAQ IPO. Previously, Mr. Ortiz was regional business unit manager at Philips Consumer Electronics responsible for launching the company's first digital photography product in the US. Mr. Ortiz has held various senior technical and business positions within the computer and electronics industries at companies including NCR, Motorola, and startups Pencom Software and On-Demand Technologies. He holds an MBA from Arizona State University, an MS in Computer Engineering from the University of South Carolina, and a BS in Computer Science from Georgia Institute of Technology.

Mr. Ortiz can be contacted at 865-220-6544 or joseph.l.ortiz@gmail.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.