Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Bowen

John T. Bowen

Dean & Barron Hilton Distinguished Chair at the Conrad N. Hilton College, University of Houston

John Bowen is Dean of the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management. He has presented marketing courses and seminars in Asia, Australia, Central America, Europe, Mexico and South America, and has published over 100 articles on marketing. He is also the North American Research Director for World Wide Hospitality Trends. Dr. Bowen is a coauthor of Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, the leading hospitality marketing textbook in the world. Currently, it is published in nine languages. He is also the coauthor of Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. A recipient of numerous awards for both his teaching and research, Dr. Bowen is a three-time recipient of CHRIE's Wiley Research Award, formerly the Van Nostrand Reinhold Research Award, which recognizes lifetime research achievements in the hospitality field. His research focus is on customer service, customer loyalty and electronic distributing systems for service industries. Dean Bowen's industry experience is in the area of food and beverage. He has worked in hotels, freestanding restaurants and as the corporate food and beverage manager of a hotel management company. For 15 years, he owned and operated Theodore Zinck's in downtown Dallas. A dedicated educator, Dr. Bowen started his teaching career in 1978 at Del Mar College's Restaurant Management Program. He was an assistant professor at the Hilton College from 1980 to 1990. In 1990, he left to teach at Bond University in Australia and returned to the United States in 1993 to take a position at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He returned to the Hilton College as Dean in 2003. Expertise & Research Interests • Customer Satisfaction • Customer Loyalty • New Product Development • Casino Player Behavior Selected Publications - Kotler, P., Bowen, J. & Makens, J. (2006). Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, N. J.: Prentice Hall. Published in eight languages. - Shock, P. Bowen, J. & Stefanelli, J. (2004). Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. New York: John Wiley and Sons. Published in three languages. - Mayer, K. Bowen, J. & Moulton, M. (2003). A Proposed Model of Service Descriptors, The Journal of Services Marketing, 17(6), 621-639. - Sparks, B., Bowen, J. & Klag, S. (2003). Restaurants and the Tourist Market. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 15(1), 6-13. - Bowen, J. & Ford, R. (2002). Does Having a Thing Make a Difference? Journal of Management, 28(3), 447-469. - Lucas, A. & Bowen, J. (2002). An Analysis of Slot Promotions. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 21(2), 189-202. Received the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism. - Su, W. & Bowen, J. (2001). Restaurant Customer Complaint Behavior. Journal of Restaurant and Foodservice Marketing, 4(2), 35-65. - Bowen, J. & Shaing-Lih C. (2001). The Relationship Between Customer Loyalty and Customer Satisfaction. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 13(5), 13-17. Awarded Best Article for 2001. - Nelson, K. & Bowen, J. (2000). Employee uniforms: Their impact on customer and employee satisfaction. Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 41(2), 86-95. - Bowen, J., & Shoemaker, S. (2003). Loyalty: A Strategic Commitment. Cornell Hotel & Restaurant Administration Quarterly, 44(5/6), 31-46. Awarded the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism. - Makens, J. & Bowen, J. (1996). Increasing Profits Through Product Merchandising. The Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 37(1), 72-79.

Mr. Bowen can be contacted at 713-743-0209 or jtbowen@Central.UH.EDU

Coming up in July 2018...

Hotel Spa: Oasis Unplugged

The driving force in current hotel spa trends is the effort to manage unprecedented levels of stress experienced by their clients. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by demanding careers and technology overload, people are craving places where they can go to momentarily escape the rigors of their daily lives. As a result, spas are positioning themselves as oases of unplugged human connection, where mindfulness and contemplation activities are becoming increasingly important. One leading hotel spa offers their clients the option to experience their treatments in total silence - no music, no talking, and no advice from the therapist - just pure unadulterated silence. Another leading hotel spa is working with a reputable medical clinic to develop a “digital detox” initiative, in which clients will be encouraged to unplug from their devices and engage in mindfulness activities to alleviate the stresses of excessive technology use. Similarly, other spas are counseling clients to resist allowing technology to monopolize their lives, and to engage in meditation and gratitude exercises in its place. The goal is to provide clients with a warm, inviting and tranquil sanctuary from the outside world, in addition to also providing genuine solutions for better sleep, proper nutrition, stress management and natural self-care. To accomplish this, some spas are incorporating a variety of new approaches - cryotherapy, Himalayan salt therapy and ayurveda treatments are becoming increasingly popular. Other spas are growing their own herbs and performing their treatments in lush outdoor gardens. Some spa therapists are being trained to assess a client's individual movement patterns to determine the most beneficial treatment specifically for them. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.