Editorial Board   

Mr. Brown

Dan Brown

Partner, Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP

Daniel Brown is a Partner in the Antitrust practice group and Hospitality group at Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP. He is located in the firm's New York office. Mr. Brown regularly counsels clients in high stakes, complex, commercial litigations and arbitrations in the areas of contract, hospitality, antitrust, fraud, fiduciary duties, banking, employment, and discrimination. Mr. Brown has frequently appeared in federal and state courts in New York and in other jurisdictions pro hac vice, and has successfully argued cases before the Appellate Division, First Department, and Second Circuit Court of Appeals. He successfully argued an appeal before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in Blue Tree Hotels Investment Canada) Ltd. v. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., 369 F.3d 212 (2d Cir. 2004), which resulted in the dismissal of alleged antitrust violations against the defendants arising from purported violations of the Robinson-Patman Act. Mr. Brown was lead counsel for Plaintiffs in Hall v. New York Roadrunners Club, 99-Civ.-4122 (E.D.N.Y.), a lawsuit brought under the Americans With Disabilities Act in connection with the running of the New York City Marathon. The historic settlement of that lawsuit included equal treatment for wheelchair athletes in the largest spectator event in the world. Mr. Brown has made significant contributions to cases that have been reported in the New York Law Journal, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal. Mr. Brown has also appeared on CNN, NBC and Court TV. Mr. Brown has presented at hospitality and other Continuing Legal Education conferences. He was previously a partner in the law firm of Bickel & Brewer.

Mr. Brown can be contacted at 212-332-3879 or dlbrown@sheppardmullin.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.