Editorial Board   

Mr. Brown

Dan Brown

Partner, Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP

Daniel Brown is a Partner in the Antitrust practice group and Hospitality group at Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP. He is located in the firm's New York office. Mr. Brown regularly counsels clients in high stakes, complex, commercial litigations and arbitrations in the areas of contract, hospitality, antitrust, fraud, fiduciary duties, banking, employment, and discrimination. Mr. Brown has frequently appeared in federal and state courts in New York and in other jurisdictions pro hac vice, and has successfully argued cases before the Appellate Division, First Department, and Second Circuit Court of Appeals. He successfully argued an appeal before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in Blue Tree Hotels Investment Canada) Ltd. v. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., 369 F.3d 212 (2d Cir. 2004), which resulted in the dismissal of alleged antitrust violations against the defendants arising from purported violations of the Robinson-Patman Act. Mr. Brown was lead counsel for Plaintiffs in Hall v. New York Roadrunners Club, 99-Civ.-4122 (E.D.N.Y.), a lawsuit brought under the Americans With Disabilities Act in connection with the running of the New York City Marathon. The historic settlement of that lawsuit included equal treatment for wheelchair athletes in the largest spectator event in the world. Mr. Brown has made significant contributions to cases that have been reported in the New York Law Journal, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal. Mr. Brown has also appeared on CNN, NBC and Court TV. Mr. Brown has presented at hospitality and other Continuing Legal Education conferences. He was previously a partner in the law firm of Bickel & Brewer.

Mr. Brown can be contacted at 212-332-3879 or dlbrown@sheppardmullin.com

Coming up in May 2020...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Creative Innovation

Being eco-friendly is no longer a fad. It is an urgent planetary need and hotels are actively doing their part to reduce their carbon footprint by implementing sustainable, green practices. In addition to the goodwill derived from doing the right thing, hotels are also realizing the benefits to their business. A large percentage of Millennials expect hotels to be eco-friendly and will only patronize those properties that are proudly conforming. Consequently, more hotels are realizing that sustainability is a key element in a successful branding strategy. In addition, going green can lead to a more profitable bottom line, as savings on electricity, water and cleaning materials can add up. Also, there are other advantages that come with being an eco-friendly business, such as government subsidies and tax and loan incentives. As a result, many hotels are finding innovative ways to integrate eco-friendly practices into their business. Geo-thermal energy systems, along with energy-from-waste systems, are being used to heat and cool the property. Passive solar panels, green roofs, natural lighting and natural ventilation strategies also assist in energy conservation. Low-flow water systems and plumbing fixtures make a contribution, as does eco-friendly hardwood flooring, and energy efficient televisions and appliances throughout the property. In addition, some hotels have implemented in-room recycling programs, and only provide all-natural, personal care items. One hotel has actually constructed a bee-keeping operation on their grounds. Not only is this good for the bees but the hotel also produces products from the operation which they sell. This kind of creative innovation also holds enormous appeal to guests. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.