Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Silvestri

Sebastien Silvestri

Vice President of Food & Beverage, The Venetian

Growing up in the south of France with a French mother and Italian father, Sebastien Silvestri learned both languages fluently and developed an appreciation for food and beverage at an early age from his uncle, a successful restaurateur in the Italian Riviera. Mr. Silvestri attended Esitel in 1993 where he studied culinary arts and hotel management and graduated with honors in 1997 after successfully completing the leadership program. Mr. Silvestri's career began at the Lanesborough Hotel in London, England where he served as a restaurant manager. He was then transferred to the United States to become the F&B Manager at The Mansion on Turtle Creek in Dallas where he worked with celebrity chef, Dean Fearing. After a successful four years with Rosewood Hotels, he welcomed his first daughter, Amelie, and relocated with his family to Tahiti in the French Polynesia where he became the Director of F&B at the Orient Express Hotel, Bora Bora Lagoon Resort and Spa. In 2005, Mr. Silvestri was recruited to open the new spa tower at Bellagio in Las Vegas and served as the General Manager at Sensi. After the birth of his second daughter, Angelique, in 2006, he relocated with his family to Newport Beach, Calif. to become the Director of F&B at The Island Hotel. Currently, Mr. Silvestri is the Vice President of Food & Beverage at The Venetian and The Palazzo Las Vegas where he oversees the properties' casino and pool beverage departments, in-suite dining department and refreshment center. He also works with several of the properties' joint venture partners including celebrity chefs Wolfgang Puck, Emeril Lagasse and Mario Batali. Mr. Silvestri enjoys spending time with his friends and family, traveling and enjoying a wide array of the world's best food and wine.

Mr. Silvestri can be contacted at 702-414-4477 or sebastien.silvestri@venetian.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.