Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Kwok

Linchi Kwok

Assistant Professor of Hospitality Management, Syracuse University

Linchi Kwok is an Assistant Professor of Hospitality Management at Syracuse University (SU) in Syracuse, New York, where he developed and teaches several hospitality and management courses, such as Managing Service Organizations in Social Media, Hospitality Human Resource Management, Hotel and Resort Operations, and Leadership and Career Management. In 2011, Mr. Kwok was named a Kauffman Professor in Entrepreneurship and Innovation at SU to support the university’s initiatives in teaching and research excellence in entrepreneurship and innovation. Mr. Kwok’s research interests include social media and its business applications, employee recruitment and selection, organizational behaviors, and hospitality management. His publications have appeared in the International Journal of Hospitality Management, Event Management, and Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism. In 2010, Mr. Kwok received grant funding to support his research on social media, including the Harrah Hospitality Research Center Grant Award Program 2010 from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Since 2008, Mr. Kwok has presented 20+ authored/co-authored papers in a variety of peer-reviewed conferences in hospitality, information studies, and managerial psychology. He is on the editorial board HOSTEUR™, an official publication of the I-CHRIE (International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education), and serves as an ad hoc reviewer for over five hospitality/social science journals and conferences. Mr. Kwok holds a Ph.D. degree in Hospitality Administration and a Master of Science degree in Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional Management from Texas Tech University. Mr. Kwok’s professional portfolio also includes several years of managerial and hands-on experience in the hospitality industry in the U.S. and mainland China. In addition to his work as a professor and researcher, Mr. Kwok is a thought leader in the hospitality field, contributing to several professional blogs about hospitality trends and social media strategies. Mr. Kwok’s perspectives on social media have been quoted in The New York Times and Voyager’s World. Mr. Kwok is also an active member of the community and have conducted invited presentations on dinner etiquette and research methods.

Mr. Kwok can be contacted at 315-443-2162 or lkwok@syr.edu

Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.