Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Kwok

Linchi Kwok

Assistant Professor of Hospitality Management, Syracuse University

Linchi Kwok is an Assistant Professor of Hospitality Management at Syracuse University (SU) in Syracuse, New York, where he developed and teaches several hospitality and management courses, such as Managing Service Organizations in Social Media, Hospitality Human Resource Management, Hotel and Resort Operations, and Leadership and Career Management. In 2011, Mr. Kwok was named a Kauffman Professor in Entrepreneurship and Innovation at SU to support the university's initiatives in teaching and research excellence in entrepreneurship and innovation. Mr. Kwok's research interests include social media and its business applications, employee recruitment and selection, organizational behaviors, and hospitality management. His publications have appeared in the International Journal of Hospitality Management, Event Management, and Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism. In 2010, Mr. Kwok received grant funding to support his research on social media, including the Harrah Hospitality Research Center Grant Award Program 2010 from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Since 2008, Mr. Kwok has presented 20+ authored/co-authored papers in a variety of peer-reviewed conferences in hospitality, information studies, and managerial psychology. He is on the editorial board HOSTEUR™, an official publication of the I-CHRIE (International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education), and serves as an ad hoc reviewer for over five hospitality/social science journals and conferences. Mr. Kwok holds a Ph.D. degree in Hospitality Administration and a Master of Science degree in Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional Management from Texas Tech University. Mr. Kwok's professional portfolio also includes several years of managerial and hands-on experience in the hospitality industry in the U.S. and mainland China. In addition to his work as a professor and researcher, Mr. Kwok is a thought leader in the hospitality field, contributing to several professional blogs about hospitality trends and social media strategies. Mr. Kwok's perspectives on social media have been quoted in The New York Times and Voyager's World. Mr. Kwok is also an active member of the community and have conducted invited presentations on dinner etiquette and research methods.

Mr. Kwok can be contacted at 315-443-2162 or lkwok@syr.edu

Coming up in November 2019...

Architecture & Design: Biophilic Design

The hospitality industry is constantly evolving to meet and exceed guest expectations. As a result, hotels are always on the lookout for new ways to improve the guest experience, and architecture and design is an essential part of this equation. Bold design is often the most effective way to make an exceptional first impression - an impression guests use to distinguish between brands. One design trend that is being embraced worldwide has become known as “Biophilic Design.” Biophilic design is based on the concept of biophilia, which is the theory that human beings have an innate tendency to seek out nature, natural elements, and natural forms. Biophilic design is more than hotels simply adding a surplus of plants; it involves incorporating specific design elements into a hotel in order to imbue it with a sense of wellness and well-being. Some of those elements include exposure to natural lighting; views of nature and rooms with a view; natural architectural patterns; salvaged or reclaimed woods of all types; reclaimed metals; sustainably sourced stone; living green walls and vertical gardens; and direct and indirect exposure to nature. Hotels that have incorporated biophilic design into their properties are reaping the benefits associated with this trend including reduced stress responses, better air quality, lower energy costs, and more positive guest reviews. Biophilic design has also been shown to improve guest moods and to satisfy consumer demand for environmental responsibility. Savvy hotel owners and managers are aware that nature-inspired elements enhance their guests' comfort and well-being, which is why this trend is becoming so prevalent. Biophilic design is just one topic in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.