Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Landry

Amy Landry

Director of Human Resources, Hotel Monteleone

Amy Landry, PHR currently serves as the Director of Human Resources at the Historic Hotel Monteleone in the heart of the French Quarter New Orleans. Ms. Landry's human resources experience comes from Hilton Worldwide, where she most recently worked opening up the Roosevelt Hotel New Orleans, with Hilton's Lifestyle & Luxury Waldorf Astoria Brand. She served as Human Resources Training & Development Manager. Ms. Landry had the unique experience of being able to work with a new brand and creating the culture and training from the ground up. She piloted many workshops for the brand and was a driving force in helping to create a service culture and training for both the Roosevelt Hotel and the entire Waldorf Astoria Brand. Prior to The Roosevelt New Orleans, Ms. Landry was with Hilton Worldwide as the Human Resources Manager at the Embassy Suites Hotel New Orleans. Ms. Landry did her undergraduate studies at Stephen F. Austin University where she received her Bachelors of Sciences in Hospitality Administration. She began her career in F&B operations and first experience in restaurant management was opening an Outback Steakhouse in Lufkin, Texas. After graduation, she pursued a life-long dream to work for Walt Disney World and accepted a college program internship at Walt Disney World Orlando working in the Magic Kingdom Theme Park. She had an amazing time at Walt Disney and first began realizing the importance of training and instilling a strong culture in every single employee. Ms. Landry then fulfilled another goal of working on a Cruise Line and accepted a job performing aboard the Disney Wonder as part of the Cruise Staff. After her cruise ship contract ended, she came back home to Houston, Texas for her next step in enrolling in the Graduate program at the University of Houston, Conrad Hilton College. Ms. Landry was very active in the Graduate Student Association and completed two graduate internships assignments for Carey Limousines of Houston and Norwegian Cruise Lines in Hawaii. Ms. Landry became passionate for the Human Resources field while in Graduate school with the influence of an inspiring HR Professor. She has made her career in Human Resources and recently earned her Professional Human Resources certification with the HRCI. Her love and understanding for the hospitality field and passion for people energize her daily and make it the perfect fit for her.

Ms. Landry can be contacted at 504-523-3341 or alandry@hotelmonteleone.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.