Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Bergkvist

Jan Peter Bergkvist

Owner, SleepwellAB

Jan Peter "JP" Bergkvist has been active in the field of Sustainable Business at an executive level in the hospitality in industry since the early nineties. 15 years with Scandic with the last 9 years in an executive management position including 4 years with Hilton International in the role of Director of Environmental Sustainability.

In January 2009 Mr. Bergkvist stepped back from his position as Vice President Sustainable Business at Scandic to a role of senior advisor working in his own business SleepWell AB. In 2010 he published the book Sustainability in Practice - a fast guide for business leaders.

Since 2010 SleepWell is running the secretariat of Sweden Textile Water Initiative, stwi.se one of the largest public-private partnerships in Sweden. STWI is founded by the leading actors in the Swedish textile industry and supported by the government. The mission is to create guide lines for and promote sustainable water use for textile production in developing countries.

Mr Bergkvist is a director of the board of Ecolabelling Sweden (the Nordic Swan) and SIWI, Stockholm International Water Institute. He also serves as chairman of the Stockholm Water Prize Founders Council and Swedish Artists for the Environment. He is a member of the advisory panel of International Tourism Partnership in London, ITP.

Mr Bergkvist has recently started a new sustainability project in southern France. In a recently acquired medieval house he has begun a total restoration with only sustainable techniques and materials. Once the house is fully restored it will serve as a test laboratory for a sustainable B&B with the ambition to combine the latest sustainability practices from different corners of the world. The soft opening will commence during 2017.

Mr. Bergkvist can be contacted at 46-766-33-6868 or janpeter.bergkvist@sleepwell.nu

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.