Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Murphy

Wade Murphy

Executive Chef, The Lodge at Doonbeg

Wade Murphy is Executive Chef at The Lodge at Doonbeg in County Clare, Ireland. A self-proclaimed “modern Irish chef” who dazzles with creative twists on the traditional cuisine of his homeland, Murphy brings native sensibility and two decades of regional and international experience to County Clare. He is responsible for all culinary operations at the 5-star hotel and golf resort, including menu creation at The Long Room, Darby's Bar, the Tea Room and the Member's Bar, as well for in-suite dining and catering. With Chef Murphy's fresh, native influence on the menu, guests of The Lodge at Doonbeg savor a true taste of Ireland with distinctively personal and contemporary twists. A native of coastal Wexford who has traveled and worked professionally all over the world, Chef Murphy was drawn into the culinary field by his grandmother, a prominent local cook who served as a mentor throughout his youth. Utilizing fresh, locally sourced ingredients, Chef Murphy takes the traditional elements of the Irish diet over the top. “I put a lot of gra into my food,” he says, which is Gaelic for “love” to express the passion with which he approaches his dishes. Salmon and cod from County Clare; Burren beef and lamb from nearby Montgomery Farms; local Irish cheeses; and seasonal herbs, heirloom tomatoes and organic lettuce grown in greenhouses at The Lodge at Doonbeg crowd Murphy's kitchen, suffusing menus with an authenticity that appeals to refined gourmets and adventurous foodies. Guests can also expect superb fish-and-chips—everybody's favorite, and Chef Murphy's, too—throughout the week. With a flair for food preparation and attentive service, Chef Murphy's history at award-winning restaurants primed him for working with Consulting Chef Tom Colicchio at The Lodge at Doonbeg. Chef Murphy's talents have not gone unnoticed: He was named “Best Chef in Connaught” in the 2009 Food & Wine Magazine Irish Restaurant Awards and among the Top 20 Irish Chefs rated by Food & Wine Magazine in 2010. Chef Murphy joined The Lodge at Doonbeg following a noteworthy run at the critically acclaimed Salt Restaurant at Lisloughrey Lodge in Cong, Ireland. From 2005-2007, he was Restaurant Chef and Banqueting Chef at Four Seasons Hotel Chicago and, before that, Sous Chef at Four Seasons Hotel Dublin. He also oversaw the openings of Four Seasons hotels in Sharm El Sheik, Egypt and London. Chef Murphy trained at D.I.T Cathal Brugha Street while apprenticing in Gorey and Dublin, and later relocated to London where he worked in hotels and restaurants. An avid golfer who feels fortunate to be stationed near the Greg Norman-designed championship links that anchor The Lodge at Doonbeg, he resides in County Clare.

Mr. Murphy can be contacted at 353659055600 or info@doonbeglodge.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.