Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Gervais

Mathias Gervais

Executive Chef, The Setai, Miami Beach

Mathias Gervais, Executive Chef at The Setai, Miami Beach, is a prodigy in the world of fine cuisine. As one of the youngest chefs to make a splash on Miami's burgeoning culinary scene, Chef Gervais brings an extensive history of fine dining experience to The Setai. Chef Gervais has an impressive resume that rivals the credentials of the most recognized chefs in the world with international culinary experience at five Michelin star-rated restaurants in France, Italy and Monaco. Holding Chef de Cuisine and Executive Sous Chef positions in the world's top kitchens, Chef Gervais honed his culinary skills working alongside renowned chefs including Annie Feolde at three Michelin star rated L'Enoteca Pincchiorri in Florence, as well as Joël Robuchon, Christophe Cussac and Takeo Yamazaki at the Hotel Metropole in Monte Carlo, Monaco, in the hotel's one and two Michelin star rated restaurants. Chef Gervais, who is originally from the south of France, specializes in a mix of French, Italian and Japanese cuisines with a focus on traditional gastronomic Japanese flavors. As Executive Chef of The Setai, Chef Gervais focuses on the hotel's foundation of Asian simplicity embracing an uncomplicated approach to the dining experience that creatively combines flavors while showcasing the singular quality of ingredients. His fundamental understanding of the hotel's Far East- and European-inspired offerings sets the stage for the creation of innovative concepts using every tool in his culinary repertoire, including the wok, steamer, tandoor and rotisserie. Chef Gervais travels to Japan frequently to visit family and friends where his interest in Asian-inspired cuisine transformed into a passion evident in his culinary style.

Please visit http://www.thesetaihotel.com for more information.

Mr. Gervais can be contacted at 305-520-6000 or mgervais@thesetaihotel.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.