Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Karpinski

Peter Karpinski

Partner, Sage Hospitality

Peter Karpinski is the creative entrepreneurial force behind both Sage Restaurant Group and Sage Hospitality. SRG is a successful Denver-based enterprise developing independent restaurants that break the mold of traditional hotel dining, while Sage Hospitality is one of the country's largest hotel management and development companies with a specialization in lifestyle and luxury properties. Through Mr. Karpinski's bold thought leadership, he has launched eleven award-winning Sage Restaurant Group concepts, all located adjacent to Sage Hospitality properties. In both roles, Mr. Karpinski leads lifestyle-focused real estate development projects and curates overall brand development, ownership, and management platforms. His entrepreneurship, unrivaled hospitality experience, and business ethics intertwine and pave the way for the continued growth of each company. With plans to duplicate core brands and launch new, unique concepts, 2017 promises to be Sage's most significant year yet. Mr. Karpinski will help lead the company's Dairy Block project in downtown Denver, introducing a full city block redevelopment featuring The Maven, a new urban upscale hotel brand, a second location of Kachina Southwestern Grill, a new bar called Poka Lola Social Club, and Class A office and retail space. Denver will also welcome a fourth location of SRG's modern steakhouse brand, Urban Farmer. Additionally, Mr. Karpinski and his team will launch two highly anticipated concepts in 2017; Bower Bird Coffee, and The Emporium Kitchen & Wine Market in the Fort Collins, CO and Savannah, GA markets. Most recently, he opened the award-winning Halcyon Hotel and second location of Departure restaurant in Denver to rave reviews.   An alum of Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration, Mr. Karpinski has gained national praise from prominent hospitality-based publications such as Food & Wine's “40 Big Food Thinkers, 40 and Under,” Nation's Restaurant News' “Power List”, and Restaurant Hospitality. Mr. Karpinski has also been recognized by influential business media including Forbes, Market Watch, CNN Money, and Denver Business Journal's “40 Under 40 Top Business Professionals”, and has appeared on Food Network's “Chef Wanted with Anne Burrell”.

Mr. Karpinski can be contacted at 303-405-8394 or peter.karpinski@sagerestaurantgroup.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.