Editorial Board   

Ms. Creighton

Myra Creighton

Partner, Fisher & Phillips LLP

Myra Creighton is a partner in Fisher & Phillips LLP's Atlanta office. Her practice in labor and employment law primarily focuses on advising clients concerning their obligations to employees under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act, ensuring their policies and procedures are consistent with both these laws and defending clients against employee claims alleging violations of the ADA and FMLA. She also counsels and defends clients concerning Title VII, ADEA, and GINA issues that arise in the workplace. Ms. Creighton routinely presents seminars, webinars, and training programs on ADA and FMLA topics such as Substance Abuse under the ADA, Managing the Medical Certification Process under the FMLA, Controlling Intermittent Leave under the FMLA, Reasonable Accommodation and the Interactive Process Under the ADA, and Medical Examinations and Inquiries under the ADA. Ms. Creighton authored the chapter entitled "Mental Disabilities Under the Americans with Disabilities Act" in the treatise, Mental and Emotional Injuries in Employment Litigation, Second Edition, published by the Bureau of National Affairs in 2001, and the 2006 and 2008 Supplements to the chapter. Ms. Creighton co-authored "No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Employee Assistance Programs As Sources of Liability," 24 Employee Relations Law Journal 79 (1998); and "Mental Disabilities Under the Americans with Disabilities Act: A Management Rights Approach," 20 Employee Relations Law Journal 541 (1995), as well as multiple other articles on ADA topics. Prior to joining Fisher & Phillips LLP in 1993, Ms. Creighton was a law clerk for Judge Duross Fitzpatrick of the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Georgia

Ms. Creighton can be contacted at 404-240-4285 or mcreighton@laborlawyers.com

Coming up in January 2020...

Mobile Technology: Meeting Tech Expectations

What once seemed futuristic is now the norm, owing to the escalating developments in mobile technology, and hotels must continue to innovate in order to meet guest expectations. In a recent study from Mower, 65 percent of guests said they would gladly pay more for a hotel that provides the mobile technology they deem essential. The same study shows that 44 percent of travelers are more likely to book a smart hotel, and nearly 7 in 10 want to use smart devices provided by the hotel. And how do guests wish to use all this technology? A majority expressed a desire for mobile check-in and check-out, and mobile payment options. They also want to be able to stream content from their phone to the TV; to make service requests of the hotel staff; to control in-room lighting, temperature and sound; to order food and beverages; and to request a wake-up call - all from their mobile device. Guests also expressed preferences for robust wi-fi and convenient device charging ports throughout the hotel. They also appreciate the use of hotel branded apps which allow a guest to book a room, access loyalty programs, receive discounts and rewards, and even use the app to choose the room, floor and view they prefer. Some hotel apps also allow a customer to track their charges throughout their stay, rather than waiting to receive a bill at the end. Finally, mobile tech lounges are popping up more frequently in some hotels. These lounges offer guests the opportunity to perform tasks like airline check-ins or access to local info guides, but they also provide a place where guests can comfortably get some work done outside their room. The January Hotel Business Review will report on what some hotels are doing to meet their customers' expectations in the mobile technology space.