Editorial Board   

Dr. Kitterlin, Ph.D.

Miranda Kitterlin, Ph.D.

Assoc. Professor, Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, FIU

Dr. Miranda Kitterlin is an Associate Professor in the Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism Management at Florida International University, where she teaches graduate level Hospitality Management courses. She received her doctoral degree in May of 2010 in Hospitality Administration from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Dr. Kitterlin holds a Master's degree in Human Resources and a Bachelor's degree in Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management from the University of Louisiana, Lafayette.

Prior to beginning a career in academia, Dr. Kitterlin worked for 11 years in the lodging and food & beverage industries in Louisiana, Michigan, and Las Vegas. What began on a whim as an entry-level front-of-house position quickly developed into operational management, sales, and human resources management roles, and a lifelong passion for Hospitality Management.

During her industry career, Dr. Kitterlin encountered a number of employee issues that led her to seek answers in academic research. Each scholarly investigative venture fueled the desire to begin another, resulting in her decision to pursue a terminal degree and a future in academia. Her first educational venture was as an instructor as St. Landry Accelerated Transition School, where she designed a Hospitality and Tourism curriculum and skills certification program for the vocational educational program.

During her university level academic career, Dr. Kitterlin has taught both traditional and online Hospitality Management classes at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, James Madison University, and now Florida International University, where she teaches Master's degree classes in Hospitality Industry Organizational Behavior, and Case Studies in Hospitality Management.

Dr. Kitterlin's research focuses primarily on Food and Beverage, Human Resources, and Organizational Behavior issues. She has published on topics of foodservice industry employee selection and screening, employee behavior and perceptions, training needs of hospitality employees, food-safety education, and hospitality student learning styles. Much of her work centers on employee substance abuse and employment drug-testing in the hospitality industry.

Please visit http://www.fiu.edu for more information.

Dr. Kitterlin, Ph.D. can be contacted at 305-919-4424 or miranda.kitterlin@fiu.edu

Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.