Editorial Board   

Dr. Kitterlin, Ph.D.

Miranda Kitterlin, Ph.D.

Assoc. Professor, Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, FIU

Dr. Miranda Kitterlin is an Associate Professor in the Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism Management at Florida International University, where she teaches graduate level Hospitality Management courses. She received her doctoral degree in May of 2010 in Hospitality Administration from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Dr. Kitterlin holds a Master's degree in Human Resources and a Bachelor's degree in Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management from the University of Louisiana, Lafayette.

Prior to beginning a career in academia, Dr. Kitterlin worked for 11 years in the lodging and food & beverage industries in Louisiana, Michigan, and Las Vegas. What began on a whim as an entry-level front-of-house position quickly developed into operational management, sales, and human resources management roles, and a lifelong passion for Hospitality Management.

During her industry career, Dr. Kitterlin encountered a number of employee issues that led her to seek answers in academic research. Each scholarly investigative venture fueled the desire to begin another, resulting in her decision to pursue a terminal degree and a future in academia. Her first educational venture was as an instructor as St. Landry Accelerated Transition School, where she designed a Hospitality and Tourism curriculum and skills certification program for the vocational educational program.

During her university level academic career, Dr. Kitterlin has taught both traditional and online Hospitality Management classes at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, James Madison University, and now Florida International University, where she teaches Master's degree classes in Hospitality Industry Organizational Behavior, and Case Studies in Hospitality Management.

Dr. Kitterlin's research focuses primarily on Food and Beverage, Human Resources, and Organizational Behavior issues. She has published on topics of foodservice industry employee selection and screening, employee behavior and perceptions, training needs of hospitality employees, food-safety education, and hospitality student learning styles. Much of her work centers on employee substance abuse and employment drug-testing in the hospitality industry.

Please visit http://www.fiu.edu for more information.

Dr. Kitterlin, Ph.D. can be contacted at 305-919-4424 or miranda.kitterlin@fiu.edu

Coming up in February 2019...

Social Media: Getting Personal

There Social media platforms have revolutionized the hotel industry. Popular sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube and Tumblr now account for 2.3 billion active users, and this phenomenon has forever transformed how businesses interact with consumers. Given that social media allows for two-way communication between businesses and consumers, the emphasis of any marketing strategy must be to positively and personally engage the customer, and there are innumerable ways to accomplish that goal. One popular strategy is to encourage hotel guests to create their own personal content - typically videos and photos -which can be shared via their personal social media networks, reaching a sizeable audience. In addition, geo-locational tags and brand hashtags can be embedded in such posts which allow them to be found via metadata searches, substantially enlarging their scope. Influencer marketing is another prevalent social media strategy. Some hotels are paying popular social media stars and bloggers to endorse their brand on social media platforms. These kinds of endorsements generally elicit a strong response because the influencers are perceived as being trustworthy by their followers, and because an influencer's followers are likely to share similar psychographic and demographic traits. Travel review sites have also become vitally important in reputation management. Travelers consistently use social media to express pleasure or frustration about their guest experiences, so it is essential that every review be attended to personally. Assuming the responsibility to address and correct customer service concerns quickly is a way to mitigate complaints and to build brand loyalty. Plus, whether reviews are favorable or unfavorable, they are a vital source of information to managers about a hotel's operational performance.  The February Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to effectively incorporate social media strategies into their businesses.