Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Bulger

Diana K. Bulger

Area Director of Public Relations, Fairmont Hotels

Diana K. Bulger joined Fairmont in 2003. She has created events and formed alliances for the hotel with numerous organizations such as The Make-Wish Foundation, The World Wildlife Fund, The Washington Animal Rescue League, The Smithsonian Institution, and Guiding Eyes for the Blind and several others. She serves as the Eco-Chair of the Fairmont's environmental committee. Prior to joining the Fairmont, she was vice president of Hisaoka Public Relations where she handled to opening public relations efforts for five Kimpton Hotels. Previously, she was the president of Kaiser Communications, a hospitality public relations company. From 1990 to 1998, she was the regional director of public relations for Loews Hotels in Washington, DC and Annapolis, Maryland. She was the director of public relations for the Hotel Washington from 1987 -1990 Ms. Bulger began her career at the Vista International Hotel as the assistant public relations manager in 1985. A huge animal lover, Bulger founded the Bark Ball in 1988 for The Washington Humane Society, the first black-tie ball to allow dogs in the nation's capital. Ms. Bulger is also a second term mayoral appointee to the District of Columbia Retirement Board and a member in good standing of Destination DC. She has penned columns for the Greater Washington Association Executives Magazine Executive Update and Potomac Life Magazine. She attended Oldfields School in Glencoe, Maryland and Franklin College in Lugano, Switzerland. She resides in Washington, DC with her Husband, transportation lobbyist, Thomas J. Bulger and their three dogs.

Ms. Bulger can be contacted at 800-441-1414 or diana.bulger@fairmont.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.