Editorial Board   Guest Author

Dr. Hawkins

Rebecca Hawkins

Managing Director, Responsible Hospitality Partnership

Rebecca Hawkins is the Managing Director of RHP Ltd, a Research Fellow of Oxford Brookes University and Visiting Professor to the International Centre for Responsible Tourism at Leeds Metropolitan University. A resource management specialist, with training in ISO 14001 implementation, Dr. Hawkins has managed a number of projects that combine the need to deliver sustainability initiatives alongside cost savings. Dr. Hawkins regularly provides training within hotel businesses and offers strategic consultancy to help senior executives in the sector design effective responsible business programs. Through RHP, she provides consulting services to a wide range of clients from across the hospitality and food service sectors. Her experience in the sector means that she has been asked to write or contribute to much of the guidance that is available to the sector on resource efficiency. She also regularly writes for the trade press. She has recently made input into UK energy and waste initiatives and has played a role in a major waste prevention initiative for the sector. She also works with many of the NGOs in the sector, for example, delivering some of the initial research about the credibility of different sustainable tourism certification initiatives and leading research into customer expectations of responsible business programs. Dr, Hawkins has recently published two books on responsible hospitality. One of these is recognized as “the complete handbook for corporate responsibility in the hospitality industry” and the other includes letters from 46 industry leaders about the importance of Green Growth.

Dr. Hawkins can be contacted at 44-1993-868392 or rebecca@rhpltd.net

Coming up in May 2018...

Eco-Friendly Practices: The Greening of Your Bottom Line

There are strong moral and ethical reasons why a hotel should incorporate eco-friendly practices into their business but it is also becoming abundantly clear that “going green” can dramatically improve a hotel's bottom line. When energy-saving measures are introduced - fluorescent bulbs, ceiling fans, linen cards, lights out cards, motion sensors for all public spaces, and energy management systems - energy bills are substantially reduced. When water-saving equipment is introduced - low-flow showerheads, low-flow toilets, waterless urinals, and serving water only on request in restaurants - water bills are also considerably reduced. Waste hauling is another major expense which can be lowered through recycling efforts and by avoiding wastefully-packaged products. Vendors can be asked to deliver products in minimal wrapping, and to deliver products one day, and pick up the packaging materials the next day - generating substantial savings. In addition, renewable sources of energy (solar, geothermal, wind, etc.) have substantially improved the economics of using alternative energies at the property level. There are other compelling reasons to initiate sustainability practices in their operation. Being green means guests and staff are healthier, which can lead to an increase in staff retention, as well as increased business from health conscious guests. Also, sooner or later, all properties will be sold, and green hotels will command a higher price due to its energy efficiencies. Finally, some hotels qualify for tax credits, subsidies and rebates from local, regional and federal governments for the eco-friendly investments they've made in their hotels. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating sustainable practices into their operations and how their hotels are benefiting from them.