Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Setzermann

Kimberly Setzermann

Co-Founder, Pure Strategic Solutions

Kimberly Setzermann is the co-founder of Pure Strategic Solutions, a fresh and young hospitality consulting company with a focus on creating profit driven innovations in Spa and F&B concept development. By utilizing her education in global wellness practices, each project strives to integrate a local culture's authentic indigenous beliefs in medicine into more common and universally accepted products and therapies. Ms. Setzermann is currently based in Africa, devising the expansion of rooms and the implementation of spa facilities for an upscale safari lodge in Arusha, Tanzania, while simultaneously streamlining lodge operations by holding the position as General Manager. Ms. Setzermann holds a Master Degree in Hospitality from Ecole hotelière de Lausanne (EHL), as well as certifications in Neuromuscular Massage Therapy (Colorado Institute of Massage Therapy), Yoga Instruction (Yoga Center of Minneapolis), and Nutritional Health Counseling (Institute for Integrative Nutrition). Ms. Setzermann's passion to study the current usage of traditional medicines have taken her to live in Japan, India, Taiwan, Turkey, Costa Rica, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. Kimberly has worked in a private practice as a Wellness Consultant in New York City, devising six-month total health programs for clients with measurable results. Ms. Setzermann has contributed as a writer and speaker for the Global Spa Summit in Istanbul, Turkey and is currently the on the board of directors for the Hotel Association Tanzania (HAT). Her enthusiasm has led her to enjoy experiences working within education at EHL as a guest speaker and coach for students that share a similar passion for the spa industry.

Ms. Setzermann can be contacted at 2550783869027 or kimberly@missionpure.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.