Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Cooper

Jeremy Cooper

Director Global Guest Initiatives / Food & Beverage, Starwood Hotel & Resorts

Jeremy Cooper is the Director of Global Guest Initiatives and Food & Beverage for Starwood Hotels & Resorts' Specialty Select Brands (SSB), including Aloft®, Element® and Four Points® by Sheraton. In this role, Cooper is responsible for leading food and beverage program development and execution in North America and international divisions. Prior to joining the Specialty Select Brand team, Cooper served as Associate Director of Food & Beverage for North America Franchise and Owner Services from 2007-2010, leading food and beverage operational support for 250+ properties across the Sheraton®, Westin®, Le Meridien® and The Luxury Collection® brands. Before his positions at Starwood Hotels & Resorts World, Inc. Mr. Cooper served as Director of Marketing at ARAMARK Corporation, where he developed retail marketing platforms and field training for B&I, Healthcare and Schools in the U.S., Spain and Chile. He has also served in a variety of Food and Beverage management roles with Four Seasons Hotels & Resorts and independent hotels in Texas. Mr. Cooper is a graduate of Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration, honing his interest in wine and culinary at Ecole Hoteliere de Lausanne. He received his Master's in Business Administration from Georgetown University. Jeremy currently resides in New York City.

Mr. Cooper can be contacted at 914-640-8100 or jeremy.cooper@starwoodhotels.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.